Village GOP ticket now three

Rye Neck resident and Board of Architectural Review member Maggie-Leigh O’Neill

Rye Neck resident and Board of Architectural Review member Maggie-Leigh O’Neill

After announcing two candidates this past week, the Village of Mamaroneck’s Republican Party filled out its 2014 ticket with a third candidate, setting its sights on all three trustee seats up for grabs this fall and majority control of the board.

Maggie-Leigh O’Neill, a Republican and Board of Architectural Review member, was announced June 12. She will join Michael Ianniello, a Republican and current chairman of the village’s Planning Board, and registered Democrat Stefanie Lividini, a member of the volunteer Budget Committee, to represent the Republican ticket in the village’s November general election.

“I’m honored and very excited about our slate,” O’Neill, a 26-year-old lifelong Rye Neck resident said. “I know I’m very young, but I think it’s important to have someone like me, who has lived here my entire life, in our local government.”

A project manager for the Manhattan architecture firm Crown Design & Consulting, O’Neill is a fourth-generation resident of Mamaroneck and has served on the village’s architecture board since filling an empty seat in 2012. She has also entered her third year as the treasurer of the village’s Republican Party.

O’Neill cited her professional experience as a driving force behind her ambition to run and ability to grow the village.

“One of the most hot-button issues throughout the village is land development and flooding, and a lot of the experience I have and work I do currently deals with development,” she said. “I have a lot of experience on the municipal side in New York City.”

As a Rye Neck resident, O’Neill didn’t comment about the future of the Town of Rye. The possible dissolution of Rye Town is currently up in the air as village officials consider whether or not to annex Rye Neck, the portion of the town that also resides within the Village of Mamaroneck.

Going forward, O’Neill said she hoped to bridge the gap between her party and village Democrats to “develop common ground” amongst all village officials.

“I’m running because I want to help build the foundation of the village,” she said. “If I can help just a little bit to build a bridge between the parties to have less opposition and more creative collaboration, that’s really my goal.”

Trustees are elected to two-year terms with an annual salary of $4,950 and health benefits.

Election Day is Nov. 4.

-Reporting by Phil Nobile