Mamaroneck’s Massa’ delivers the sea’s best

Dining room at Massa’

Dining room at Massa’

You don’t have to travel 4,000 miles for an authentic Mediterranean meal. “Ocean-to-table” offerings at Massa’ Coastal Italian Cuisine in Mamaroneck utilize the freshest fish straight from the source.

The langoustines I enjoyed for lunch one summer afternoon were flown in directly from Europe. Prepared simply with salt, pepper and a little bit of notably high quality olive oil, this sweeter shellfish was flawlessly executed. Langoustines are not a fixture on many local menus, and I relished the opportunity to savor them here.

Much of the seafood Massa’ sources comes from towns spanning several countries along the Mediterranean. These fish are flown in fresh, not frozen, three or four times per week from the restaurant’s various contacts at fisheries in Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal. All are line or net caught. Massa’ serves American fish, too, which is handpicked from the New Fulton Fish Market at Hunts Point.

I watched Francesco masterfully filet this fish for nearby guests.

I watched Francesco masterfully filet this fish for nearby guests.

Most fish are prepared using very few ingredients, as the kitchen feels it best not to mess with what nature has already perfected.

Naturally, executive chefs and owners—a father and son team—Pasquale and Francesco Coli are big fish lovers. For Francesco, this passion dates back to his upbringing along the water in Puglia, Italy. As a child, he spent a considerable amount of time catching fish in the Mediterranean with a spear gun.

Pasquale worked for nine years as a chef on Italian cruise ships and two subsequent years as a proprietor of his own restaurant called Michelangelo. Inspiration for Massa’—both at its prior Scarsdale location and its current Mamaroneck address—was born from the combination of these experiences.

When I arrived for lunch, Francesco was behind the bar adding more pineapple chunks to a large jug of homemade infused vodka. He leaves the fruit soaking in the alcohol for at least 24 hours in order to achieve the desired effect, but some of his concoctions require a full 48 hours.

Langoustines straight from the Mediterranean and prepared simply with olive oil, salt and pepper.

Langoustines straight from the Mediterranean and prepared simply with olive oil, salt and pepper.

Other fruits Francesco often employs are watermelon and mixed berries, and he has recently served a coconut infused rum. He tries to make use of what’s in season in both food and drink selections.

After my first course of langoustines, Francesco brought me branzino, a popular menu staple. The man beside me at the bar was already eating one. He said he often comes to Massa’ with friends and instructs Francesco to “make whatever” for the table, but the branzino is a favorite of his. This customer also noted Massa’ is a little out of his way, but he makes it at point to come as much as possible.

Piping hot bag of zeppoles served with a hazelnut dipping sauce.

Piping hot bag of zeppoles served with a hazelnut dipping sauce.

Given the ever-changing menu, one could dine at Massa’ daily and have a different experience each time. Massa’ can serve as both a special occasion place and an extension of guests’ homes. Francesco’s jovial demeanor is very inviting; he was quite friendly with everyone, and I was not surprised to learn he has many regular customers. He’s a funny, approachable guy whom I really enjoyed getting to know.

The branzino is cooked with assorted vegetables in parchment paper, which steams the fish and locks in all of the flavor. As I enjoyed the dish, I watched Francesco masterfully filet another fish for nearby guests and top it with capers. Francesco reminded me both fish, like most he serves, are grilled simply to produce a taste evocative of the sea—the taste on which he was raised.

Unwrapped branzino steamed in parchment paper with veggies. Photos/Emily Giove

Unwrapped branzino steamed in parchment paper with veggies. Photos/Emily Giove

As Francesco does not rely on many ingredients in his cooking, he said a very sharp knife is the one item his kitchen could not survive without. In his personal diet, as much as he loves seafood, he could never subsist without really good bread.

My meal concluded with a piping hot bag of zeppoles served with a hazelnut dipping sauce. I struggled tremendously to restrain myself from consuming all six that came in the order. These classic Italian dough balls were an impressive finish to a delicious meal from the less-than-a-year-old Massa’.

I was told there’s more to look forward to than seasonal menu tweaks. On the horizon for Francesco and his restaurant is a Massa4“Massa’ Living” e-commerce site. It will feature items like homemade pastas, tomato sauces and olive oils from Umbria and Puglia.

Once launched, everyone can bring a little taste of southeastern Italy into the kitchen.

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Massa’ Coastal Italian Cuisine
599 E. Boston
Post Road
Mamaroneck, N.Y.
massacoastal.com

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