Luxury condos proposed

Pondfield Court LLC is proposing to turn a defunct warehouse into a luxury condominium. Bronxville’s Planning Board is currently vetting the proposal.

Pondfield Court LLC is proposing to turn a defunct warehouse into a luxury condominium. Bronxville’s Planning Board is currently vetting the proposal.

By CHRIS EBERHART

A proposal for luxury condominiums in Bronxville will attempt to reverse the fortunes of the peculiar case of 100 Pondfield Road.

The property itself is an oddity—a vacant, landlocked warehouse enclosed by buildings on all sides and only accessible through a long and narrow access drive.

It was formerly owned by millionaire real estate developer Steven Green, who suffered permanent neurological damage after being struck by a car in a hit-and-run incident outside of a nightclub in New York City in 2007 before spending time in prison for Social Security fraud and failing to file income tax returns.

Green had initially proposed to turn the warehouse into luxury apartments and office space with an 18-car garage and rooftop pool and was conditionally granted variances in 2006, but he was unable to proceed with the project after the accident.

In March 2011, Pondfield Court LLC, a Yonkers-based real estate firm, bought the property for $1.12 million and submitted an application to Bronxville’s Building Department to turn the defunct warehouse into four stories of multi-million-dollar luxury condominiums.

The warehouse at 100 Pondfield Road is surrounded by buildings on all sides and is only accessible through a narrow access drive. Contributed photos

The warehouse at 100 Pondfield Road is surrounded by buildings on all sides and is only accessible through a narrow access drive. Contributed photos

The proposal is for 11 residential units—two one-bedroom units, eight two-bedroom units and one two-bedroom duplex—a 22-space parking lot on the ground floor, and a fitness center and resident’s lounge on the second floor.

The project will require site plan approval and two special permits—one to exceed the maximum 2,000-square-foot unit area and one to have four parking spaces smaller than the mandated eight feet six inches by the village’s Planning Board—and two to four variances, most of which are for the height of the building, from the Zoning Board of Appeals.

“I think it’s a very nice building with an attractive design,” Anna Longobardo, vice chairwoman of the Planning Board, said. “But it’s in an awkward location on a busy street with a long driveway. I think the location is going to be problematic.”

During the July 9 Planning Board meeting, Stephen Maffia, a traffic engineer from Ferrandino and Associates, an Elmsford-based planning and development consultant hired by Pondfield Court LLC to conduct a traffic analysis, spoke about the access drive.

He said the project would only create an extra six or seven cars to the area’s traffic, which has “no significant impact on current traffic conditions.”

Maffia said the access drive is about 15 feet in width, which is wide enough for two cars to fit at the same time. He showed a picture to the Planning Board in which two cars are parked side-by-side at the driveway’s entrance.

But, Maffia said, most of the time there will only be one car coming in or out and not both simultaneously.

The developer’s attorney Hannah Gross, of Gross and Stabile LLP, said construction for the project is expected to take approximately 18 months and cost $4 million. Gross said that estimate could go up.

The Planning Board opened the public hearing, which will continue during the next meeting scheduled for Aug. 13.

CONTACT: christopher@hometwn.com