Letter: Bramson has a lot to learn

To the Editor,

I have lived in New Rochelle for many years and I appreciate the multi-cultural community in which I live. My children have gone through the school system from Columbus Elementary School, through Isaac E. Young Middle School and both graduated from New Rochelle High School. I have always served this community as a volunteer—whether it’s the Boys & Girls Club, New Rochelle F.C. Travel Soccer, PTA’s and chess clubs. And I was previously elected to the New Rochelle Board of Education. I’ve always found it important to be flexible, inclusive and tolerant—democratic virtues that I learned from working as a farm worker and garment worker advocate and also as a member of nationally recognized immigrant rights organizations. It’s always about working with people struggling everyday for a better life. It is what Cesar Chavez taught me—it is what Jacob Javitz and Daniel Patrick Moynihan taught me. It is what William Kunstler and Arthur Kinoy taught me early in my legal career. Respect and consideration for your fellow human being is what I learned in the Hasidic household I was raised in where my mother was the live-in housekeeper.

Noam Bramson, as far as I know, has been a professional politician since leaving Harvard. His maturity has come at the expense of some New Rochelle taxpayers supporting his way of life. He has inculcated a public persona that pretends to know everything yet is less flexible in accepting anyone else’s opinion. He pretends to be a leader of this “diverse” community, yet his unique diversity training has not pushed him to an emotional awareness of the ways in which cultural differences affect life experiences. He has fallen for the trap of political contributions at the expense of working people of color who must now live with the possibility of a significant intrusion in their life by having a city public works yard in their overcrowded neighborhood—my neighborhood. Note, Mr. Bramson has never asked my community for their opinion about this transfer. He has never ventured into my community to speak with those who live there—do you know Mr. Bramson that we have the most Mexican restaurants in
Westchester County? Do you know that one of our elementary schools, Columbus, is one of the highest performing schools in New York State, yet is it almost 85 percent Latino?

So my advice to Mr. Bramson is this:

• Have community conversations about race since they are key to solving New Rochelle’s racial inequities; you can then build a truly inclusive community, workplace and improve our schools.

• Creating meaningful cross-race conversations will help you make real this country’s fundamental principles of justice, equality, opportunity and racial inclusion for all.

 

Martin Sanchez,

New Rochelle