Larchmont mayor, trustees re-elected

On Tuesday, Larchmont’s Democratic Mayor Anne McAndrews, center, and Democratic village trustees Marlene Kolbert and Peter Fanelli retained their positions on the Board of Trustees after running in an uncontested election. Photo courtesy Larchmont-Mamaroneck League of Women Voters

On Tuesday, Larchmont’s Democratic Mayor Anne McAndrews, center, and Democratic village trustees Marlene Kolbert and Peter Fanelli retained their positions on the Board of Trustees after running in an uncontested election. Photo courtesy Larchmont-Mamaroneck League of Women Voters

By PHIL NOBILE
Larchmont residents will see familiar faces across the board with the 2014 village elections going uncontested in the Democratic incumbents’ favor.

Mayor Anne McAndrews and trustees Marlene Kolbert and Peter Fanelli ran unopposed this season, with 87 total votes cast at the polls on March 18.

The results continue a trend of the village being dominated by Democrats, not having faced any Republican opposition for several years.

The incumbent mayor described the ability to continue serving Larchmont as an “honor.”

“I’m privileged to have the opportunity to serve the community that I love so much,” McAndrews, 68, said. “I feel very grateful, and I always have considered the service an honor.”

McAndrews, a Larchmont resident for more than 35 years, won re-election with 80 votes and will serve her second, two-year term as mayor.

After serving her first term as mayor, which was preceded by five terms as a trustee, McAndrews said there was plenty of work to be done and initiatives started under her administration to continue, including a streetscape project to aesthetically improve the village and modernizing computer systems in Village Hall.

For Kolbert, who was re-elected with 81 votes and will enter her seventh term as trustee, there are plenty of sustainability and environmental projects to be done, including the board’s goal of fulfilling Larchmont’s Climate Action Plan and reducing the village carbon footprint by 20 percent by 2015.

“I would like to see our sustainability in the Sound Shore improved,” Kolbert, 76, said. “We really are in a crisis and have to make some steps, and our job as trustees is not only to make the village sustainable, but educate our constituents as well.”

Fanelli, 54, who has family roots in Larchmont dating back to 1923, secured 86 total votes and on election night said infrastructure and internal updates would be a key component going forward for the McAndrews administration.

“We’re going to focus on the infrastructure for sure: it’s been neglected and needs to be addressed,” the lifelong resident of Larchmont said.

When asked about the entire village being Democrat-led, McAndrews denied any “political playbooks” getting in the way of the local-level issues in Larchmont.

“We are in the provision of services business: police, fire, department of public works,” the mayor said. “There’s no Democratic versus Republican way to cater to issues like potholes and quality of life matters. You would think we would all be of the single mind, but at this local level, you get five different opinions.”

The Larchmont Board of Trustees meets once a month at Village Hall, located at 120 Larchmont Ave. Trustees are elected to the board to two-year terms and receive no annual compensation.

CONTACT: phil@hometwn.com

 
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About Phil Nobile

Phil Nobile is a Staff Writer for Hometown Media, mainly writing for the Harrison Review and the Mamaroneck Review. Before joining the Review, Nobile held a web internship at the Hartford Courant performing multiple journalism tasks. A graduate of Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., Nobile wrote for the school’s newspaper, the Quinnipiac Chronicle, and held other leadership positions in organizations on campus. Nobile is a lifelong Westchester County resident. You can reach him at 914-653-1000 x17 or phil@hometwn.com. You can also follow him on Twitter @harrisonreview.