Crestwood station area to be revitalized

Repairs to the Ice Casino are set to go on as planned, while county officials wait to see whether they will receive the FEMA money for which they applied after Hurricane Sandy severely damaged Playland. Contributed photo

Repairs to the Ice Casino are set to go on as planned, while county officials wait to see whether they will receive the FEMA money for which they applied after Hurricane Sandy severely damaged Playland. Contributed photo

By GERARD NOLAN
The Crestwood train station and the surrounding corridor are undergoing a renaissance as a number of construction and renovation projects come to the area.
The projects are part of an effort to make the community more attractive to young professionals who would take advantage of the proximity to the Crestwood station, which provides train access to New York City and White Plains, as well as increase foot traffic for area businesses.

Anchoring the corridor will be an apartment building across the street from the station on Columbus Avenue that will hold 44 studio and five one-bedroom units, along with some commercial space on the ground floor.

The project’s developer has secured the necessary approvals and has fenced off the lot where two defunct gas stations await demolition to make way for the project.

The village plans to move power lines on Columbus and Fisher avenues near the train station underground, a move that will give the streetscape a cleaner, less cluttered look, according to village officials. The project will be bankrolled by grant money from the state and undertaken by Con Edison, according to Village Trustee Greg Luisi, a Republican.

“We’re taking everything that’s above ground and putting underground,” Luisi said. “That’s a great idea.”

Meanwhile, across the street, the Crestwood station’s renovation continues, according to Marjorie Anders, MTA spokesperson.

When the renovation is complete, the MTA, which owns the station, hopes to lease the space to a business, but that plan is in the early stages.

“We have no tenant in mind,” Anders said. “We’re looking for a tenant.”

Village Trustee Stephen Quigley, a Democrat, sounded an optimistic note concerning the projects, saying that centralizing shops and apartments close to the station cut down on the need for car use, reduce pollution and make the village more environmentally sustainable.

“Having it built right across from a train station, you don’t need to get into a car,” Quigley said.

Luisi expressed hope that projects like these would prove to be an economic boon to the village. Transforming the town into a more attractive locale should translate to more money for village merchants and ultimately the village itself.

“We need to generate foot traffic in the village,” he said. “Foot traffic will supply the businesses and hopefully make us a little bit more viable.”

Both Luisi and Quigley addressed concerns that the new apartment building wouldn’t increase school rolls or crowd the neighborhood.

“We don’t anticipate a lot of school age children or a major influx of residents in the neighborhood,” Quigley said.

Luisi said that, while he doesn’t want to see the village overrun with pedestrians, the village could stand to have more foot traffic, especially in the evenings when shopkeepers say their business slacks off.

“There’s a balance that needs to be struck, but right now we need more foot traffic in Tuckahoe,” he said.

A phone call to Republican Trustee Janette Hayes was not returned as of press time.
email: gerard@hometwn.com