Category Archives: Uncategorized

Gia Mancini drives to the basket against Irvington on Dec. 26. Mancini finished with 23 points and six rebounds in a 57-55 loss. Photos/Bobby Begun

Huskies fall to Bulldogs

 

Gina Nuvoloni rushes past Irvington’s Lindsay Halpin last Saturday. Nuvoloni had 11 points for Harrison.

Gina Nuvoloni rushes past Irvington’s Lindsay Halpin last Saturday. Nuvoloni had 11 points for Harrison.

By MIKE SMITH
On Saturday, Dec. 26, a Harrison program on the rise got a chance to test its mettle at the annual Slam Dunk Challenge at the Westchester County Center against a good Irvington team. Even though the Huskies were unable to come away with the win, falling 57-55 to the reigning Class B champs, head coach Louis Kail felt that the team’s performance bodes well for the rest of the season. 

According to the fourth-year head coach, Harrison entered the season eying a trip to the Class A semifinals, which are played every year at the County Center, and last Saturday’s tilt with the Bulldogs should help stoke the team’s competitive fire.

“Ever since I took over, we’ve talked a lot about getting to the County Center in the section tournament,” Kail said. “And to get an invite to the Slam Dunk [tournament], we didn’t come up with a win, but I think it was a priceless experience for the girls.”

Avery LaBarbera takes a jump shot. LaBarbera had 20 points in a losing effort against Irvington.

Avery LaBarbera takes a jump shot. LaBarbera had 20 points in a losing effort against Irvington.

After a strong performance in the first quarter, Irvington surged in the second to head into the half with a 38-28 lead. The Bulldogs led by as many as 13 points after the break, before Harrison came storming back to take the lead, thanks in part to a 13-point explosion by Gia Mancini in the third quarter.

Mancini finished with 23 points on the afternoon, while teammate Avery LaBarbera netted 20 points and picked up seven steals in the loss.

“I don’t like to talk about moral victories, but against an unbelievable Irvington team, we showed a lot of resilience,” the head coach said. “You know a team like Irvington, with a coach like Gina Maher, is going make a run and we did an unbelievable job to stay with them.”

Although the Huskies ultimately fell short, Kail was impressed with the way his team performed, especially given that it was without the services of senior captain Jess Scazzero who is sidelined with an ankle injury. In her place, sophomore Gina Nuvoloni got the start for Harrison and scored 11 points while providing toughness on the defensive end.

“We went with a younger lineup [because of the injury] with Gina who only has about five games of experience,” Kail said. “But Gina [is] going to continue to learn and grow, and when Jess comes back, she is going to have a lot more experience under her belt.”

Gia Mancini drives to the basket against Irvington on Dec. 26. Mancini finished with 23 points and six rebounds in a 57-55 loss. Photos/Bobby Begun

Gia Mancini drives to the basket against Irvington on Dec. 26. Mancini finished with 23 points and six rebounds in a 57-55 loss. Photos/Bobby Begun

Harrison’s schedule does not get any easier when the team comes back after the new year, as the Huskies will travel to North Rockland to take on the Class AA Red Raiders on Jan. 6 and follow that contest with a showdown against a tough league foe in Rye on Jan. 12.

“We’re really getting into it now, and our last four games were a big test for us,” Kail said. “We’ve learned a lot from our losses and we’re ready to get into the midst of our schedule.”

CONTACT: sports@hometwn.com

 

Brady Lefkowitz goes for a layup against the Bulldogs.

Brady Lefkowitz goes for a layup against the Bulldogs.

 

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The North Pole comes to life in Eastchester

On Dec. 5, in a celebration to kick off Winterfest 2015, Tuckahoe Mayor Steve Ecklond switched on the official Christmas tree lights promptly at 6 p.m. The crowd of approximately 100 people cheered and members of the Asbury Summer Theatre company, dressed in costumes suitable for “A Christmas Carol,” sang carols.

As is the custom, Santa arrived shortly after on an Eastchester fire engine ladder truck, with lights blazing and sirens blaring. In his remarks, the mayor thanked the Tuckahoe Department of Public Works for setting up the synthetic ice rink for revelers to enjoy.

-Reporting by Sarah Varney

CONTACT: sarah@hometwn.com

 

 

Titans start season fast

 

Jackson Schultz fires a puck on net. Photo/Mike Smith

Jackson Schultz fires a puck on net. Photo/Mike Smith

By MIKE SMITH
On Nov. 27, Rye Town/Harrison’s hockey team took the ice after a nearly nine-month layoff, sending an emphatic reminder to the rest of the section with a 5-1 win over Monroe Woodbury in the opening game of the Guy Mathews Tournament. The message was clear: this year, the Titans are hoping to win the last game of the season.

Last March, the Titans skated their way into the Division II championship game where they fell to eventual winner Pelham 9-1. With a host of returners this winter, the Titans entered Friday’s game eager to prove their doubters wrong.

“All the guys coming back this year wanted to come out and show everyone that [last year] wasn’t a fluke,” senior goalie Joey Livornese said. “It was about team play, not individual efforts last year, and we want to get right back to the same spot.”

Ike Murov skates around a Monroe defender during the Nov. 27 contest. Photo/Bobby Begun

Ike Murov skates around a Monroe defender during the Nov. 27 contest. Photo/Bobby Begun

The Titans’ commitment to unselfish hockey was apparent throughout their showdown with the Crusaders. Although Livornese was named the top star of the game, the rest of the Titans’ skaters showed an ability to turn the extra pass into points, as Max Picker, Jackson Schultz and Sam Adler all finished with a goal and an assist in the season-opening win. From the close of the first period, Rye Town/Harrison outscored the Crusaders 4-0.

“We were just looking to get off to a fast start this year,” Titans’ coach Jason Head said. “Last season, it took us a little while to get going, so we had a bunch of scrimmages lined up this year to work out all the kinks.”

With more than a dozen players from last year’s team on the roster, Head said that his team has skated with a sense of urgency in the early going of the season. Head has asked his returners to set the tone for the squad’s younger players who may be getting their first taste of varsity experience.

Jackson Schultz dives to center the puck against the Crusaders. Schultz had a goal and an assist against Monroe Woodbury. Photo/Bobby Begun

Jackson Schultz dives to center the puck against the Crusaders. Schultz had a goal and an assist against Monroe Woodbury. Photo/Bobby Begun

“I think we didn’t have a good showing against Pelham last year and that’s a game these guys wanted back,” he said. “We did a lot of growing in the offseason and we’ve got a bunch of kids who came up from modified to support us.”

So far, the signs have been promising.

After topping the Crusaders in the opening round of the tournament, the Titans reeled off two more wins, beating Stepinac 6-2 and Yorktown 4-1 to improve to 3-0 on the young season. With tough games against New Rochelle and Mamaroneck looming in December, Livornese and his teammates are hoping to parlay this quick start into wins over the rest of Section I.

“We always talk about how the first goal is the most important goal of the game, but the same thing goes for a whole season,” Livornese said. “The boys came out flying and we hope that this is going to set the tone for the rest of the season.”

Contact: sports@hometwn.com

Joey Livornese makes a save against Monroe Woodbury on Nov. 27. Livornese and the Titans topped the Crusaders 5-1 to kick off the season. Photo/Mike Smith

Joey Livornese makes a save against Monroe Woodbury on Nov. 27. Livornese and the Titans topped the Crusaders 5-1 to kick off the season. Photo/Mike Smith

 
LETTER

Letter: Fresh and new may not be what’s best

 

 

To the Editor,

Rye does not stand at a crossroads. The reform of our government began when Mayor Sack and the current council were elected to office in 2013. Meg Cameron, the current Rye Democratic Party chairwoman, was beaten badly in that election as a candidate for city council.

Richard Slack and Richard Mecca were appointed two vacant council seats in January 2014, and ran in a special election last November to serve out their terms in 2015. In that election, Cameron not only chose not to run as a Democratic candidate against Rich Mecca and Richard Slack, she actually supported the election of each by endorsing both candidates.

Now, we are all to believe that Mecca and Slack—who Cameron fully supported—and the rest of the current city council has laid the entire City of Rye to waste in 12 short months?

And why? Because Cameron says so.

Here’s the truth: Meg fashioned herself as a “new voice” during her failed run for city council in 2013. She has repackaged and reused that slogan to attack the very people she once endorsed and to malign the entire current city council through her new voices and fresh faces ticket.

That ticket is so new that they have never even seen a council packet, which backgrounds each issue on the city council agenda and is available online, as Jeff Taylor admitted to John Carey during his RyeTV interview last month.

That ticket is so fresh that they will insult the elected officials of Port Chester—who have authority over a million-square-foot development that threatens Rye’s neighborhoods—by saying those elected officials tend to “shoot their mouth off on topics they have no idea what they are talking about.” Again, see Mr. Taylor’s interview with Judge Carey.

Is that how Meg Cameron and Democrats Jeff, Danielle and Emily intend to represent Rye? By insulting the elected officials of our neighboring village? Is that how to best mitigate the impacts of the United Hospital development, by mocking the very people we need to work with?

Unfortunately, it appears so.

After all, Jeff, Danielle and Emily have used the entire election cycle to insult the elected officials of our own city and the intelligence of our voters. That is not new, just fresh.

Leon Sculti,

Republican city council candidate

Andrew Schultz hauls in a pass on a two-point conversion against Tappan Zee. Photos/Mike Smith

Eagles maul Dutchmen

John Arcidiacono looks for some running room in a 48-0 romp over Tappan Zee. Arcidiacono and the Eagles will take on John Jay Cross River in the Class A quarterfinal round.

John Arcidiacono looks for some running room in a 48-0 romp over Tappan Zee. Arcidiacono and the Eagles will take on John Jay Cross River in the Class A quarterfinal round.

By MIKE SMITH
Eastchester’s football team has given area fans plenty to cheer about this fall, as the Eagles stormed through the regular season with a perfect 6-0 record en route to a No. 2 seed in the Class A playoffs. On Oct. 17, the Eagles continued their unbeaten streak, routing Tappan Zee 48-0 to advance to the quarterfinal round.

Michael Cesarini and John Guido paved the way for the Eastchester win, combining for 253 rushing yards on the day. Cesarini wasted little time igniting the offense, breaking a 63-yard run on Eastchester’s first play from scrimmage that set up the home team’s first score of the day. Guido put the game out of reach with three scores in the second quarter to give his squad a 34-0 lead at the half.

Eastchester coach Fred DiCarlo said that the offensive outburst against the Dutchmen was due, in part, to the Eagles’ wide array of weapons. With Tappan Zee focusing their attention on limiting the effectiveness of standout quarterback John Arcidiacono—who finished the day with 76 rushing yards and 68 passing yards—it was up to the rest of the starters to shoulder the load.

John Guido shakes off a Dutchmen tackler. Guido finished with 126 rushing yards on the afternoon.

John Guido shakes off a Dutchmen tackler. Guido finished with 126 rushing yards on the afternoon.

“If you take something away, we have the confidence that someone else is going to pick it up,” DiCarlo said. “I think Tappan Zee made a point to defend Johnny [Arcidiacono] and [wideout] Andrew Schultz, so the other guys just had to keep us moving.”

Coming into the game, the Eagles were putting their unblemished record on the line against the No. 15 Dutchmen who had a 5-1 regular season record. Throughout the week, DiCarlo said, the Eagles were intent on fine-tuning their own execution and blocking out any postseason noise.

“We came in knowing that we needed to take care of ourselves offensively and defensively and play sound football,” he said. “We didn’t take anything for granted and we just tried to come out strong from the first play.”

Eastchester now advances to the Class A quarterfinals, where they will tangle with No. 7-seeded John Jay. In the qualifying round, John Jay bested Sleepy Hollow in a wild 37-35 game, and DiCarlo is well aware that the Patriots, and their quarterback Paul Bloshuk who threw for four touchdowns last week, present a huge challenge to the surging Eagles.

Andrew Schultz hauls in a pass on a two-point conversion against Tappan Zee. Photos/Mike Smith

Andrew Schultz hauls in a pass on a two-point conversion against Tappan Zee. Photos/Mike Smith

“They’re a very dangerous offensive team; they had a high ranking in the preseason, they played a tough schedule, and they have an up-tempo offense,” DiCarlo said. “We’re going to have to come out and do the little things right.”

With a win, the Eagles would move one step closer to the section title game, but DiCarlo said that his team is squarely focused on the task at hand.

“We come into each week thinking we have to prove ourselves,” he said. “The kids hear the rumblings that we only have a good record because our schedule wasn’t as strong, so they want to prove that they belong here.”

Contact: sports@hometwn.com

 

John Arcidiacono looks for some running room in a 48-0 romp over Tappan Zee. Arcidiacono and the Eagles will take on John Jay Cross River in the Class A quarterfinal round.

John Arcidiacono looks for some running room in a 48-0 romp over Tappan Zee. Arcidiacono and the Eagles will take on John Jay Cross River in the Class A quarterfinal round.

 
Basketball and tennis courts at Florence, Stanley, and Warren Avenue parks are set to receive some much-needed renovations after the village board voted to approve $220,000 worth of renovations. Photos/James Pero

Village parks to receive $220K renovations

The tennis court at Florence Park is also set to be repaved, in order to provide a level and playable surface.

The tennis court at Florence Park is also set to be repaved, in order to provide a level and playable surface.

By James Pero
Several of Mamaroneck’s recreational courts are ready to get back on their A-game following the village’s allocation of $220,000 toward much-needed renovations.

On Sept. 16, the Board of Trustees voted to allot the money, which is being taken from the village’s reserve funds, to three of the village’s public parks. The renovations, according to the board, are being carried out in an effort to improve the deteriorating recreation facilities at Stanley Avenue Park, Warren Avenue Park and Florence Park, which Village Manager Richard Slingerland explained have already been the subject of several complaints from village residents.

The money, which has been earmarked for the project since 2012 but was pushed aside for other more pressing projects, according to Slingerland, will go toward improving the basketball courts in all three parks and the tennis court located at Florence Park. The village is set to mill and level the surface of the tennis court at Warren Park, remove any invasive species that may damage it and provide a new fence around the court itself.

The three basketball courts being renovated will also be leveled off and repaved, and the court at Warren Park will have the backboards, hoops and fences surrounding the court replaced. All of the court sealing work will take place in the spring of 2016 after the asphalt has had sufficient time to cure, according to Slingerland.

Basketball and tennis courts at Florence, Stanley, and Warren Avenue parks are set to receive some much-needed renovations after the village board voted to approve $220,000 worth of renovations. Photos/James Pero

Basketball and tennis courts at Florence, Stanley, and Warren Avenue parks are set to receive some much-needed renovations after the village board voted to approve $220,000 worth of renovations. Photos/James Pero

“[Residents] have been talking and complaining about the conditions for a long time,” said Mayor Norman Rosenblum, a Republican, in regard to the park renovations. “This has to do with quality of life…Not only will you improve the facilities, but you’ll improve the safety.”

According to Slingerland, safety was also taken into account especially when outlining the renovations to be done at Florence Park. He explained there is curbing there—a remnant from a skating rink which occupied the site prior—that the project plans on amending.

“The basketball court at Florence Park is currently in a curbed area…We thought that the curbing wasn’t the best physical plant for a basketball court,” the village manager said. “It’s a tripping hazard.”

As a part of the new plans, the curbing will be paved over and the court will now feature new concrete and a level plane for residents looking to enjoy a basketball game.

All three projects, according to Slingerland, are set to be completed by June 2016, just in time for their peak seasonal use.

“We are excited to see more people make use of these playground and park areas when the work is finished,” he said.

CONTACT: james@hometwn.com

 
LETTER

Letter: Republican concerned about village leadership

 

 

To the Editor,

I read Angela Giraldo’s letter to the editor regarding the recent action taken by the Westchester County Board of Elections. After doing some research, I now understand that Ms. Giraldo’s letter was misleading and disingenuous, as it put a negative spin on what was actually an act of public duty. In fact, the Westchester County Board of Elections threw out the Independence Party nomination petitions of Mayor Rosenblum and Deputy Mayor Santoro because they violated the election law.

I was brought up learning the difference between right and wrong. Cheating is wrong. Angela Giraldo, one of our local district leaders, publicly supports “cheating” as an option in the upcoming mayoral campaign. Last I checked, an election is a legal process. Soliciting signatures is a part of that process. If the signatures you solicit are not “valid” because they were solicited from outside of the Village of Mamaroneck or the people named weren’t even registered to vote, they should not be counted.

In addition, I—and I think most residents—expect our candidates and elected officials to respect the law. Rosenblum and Santoro were caught submitting names that weren’t eligible. That is the simple truth. Following the election law demonstrates true democratic—and all political party—values. Ensuring that rules and laws are followed is very important in ensuring a fair electoral process.
I interpret the actions of those who appealed as diligent. No candidate should be allowed to cheat, not even the current mayor. As a registered Republican, I didn’t start out this past year with an opinion of our current village politicians; however, I sure have ended this past year with serious concerns about how they run our village.

Village residents need to get involved and see firsthand how our village is being run so they can understand what the real values are of our current leaders and how things get done in the village. It’s clearly not a fair democratic process.

 

Jocelyn Donat,

Mamaroneck

starbucks5

Tuckahoe residents sign petition, call for fast food ban

Starbucks, pictured, and Carvel are the only franchises currently in Tuckahoe. Yet, in light of Subway forthcoming entrance in to the village’s marketplace, local residents signed a petition urging the Board of Trustees to amend the zoning code to ban future fast food restaurants.  File photo

Starbucks, pictured, and Carvel are the only franchises currently in Tuckahoe. Yet, in light of Subway forthcoming entrance in to the village’s marketplace, local residents signed a petition urging the Board of Trustees to amend the zoning code to ban future fast food restaurants. File photo

By CHRIS EBERHART
In reaction to Subway’s impending entrance into Tuckahoe, village residents circulated petitions urging the village’s Board of Trustees to amend its zoning code to ban similar fast food shops and chain restaurants from joining the sub shop in the village.

The Subway project is currently at the tail end of the planning process. Developers were able to find two more parking spots, giving them four in total, which brings the sub shop up to code and does away with the need for a variance. And with only the architectural design approval from the Planning Board pending, Subway is all but certain to join Tuckahoe’s Main Street landscape.

So while it’s too late to stop Subway from becoming part of the village, residents are turning their attention to future fast food shops and chain restaurants that may want to open their doors in the community.

During the July 13 village board meeting, Tuckahoe resident Albert Stern, who has been against Subway since its inception in late March, handed the village trustees petitions with more than 200 signatures urging the board to amend the zoning code to ban Subway-like restaurants in Tuckahoe.

The neighboring communities of Eastchester and Bronxville already have a ban in place, with Eastchester recently amending its zoning code in March 2013 to include what it defines as fast food and chain restaurants.

Margaret Uhle, head of Eastchester’s Building Department, said the town eliminated the definitions that were “believed to be imprecise and outdated,” such as cafeterias, full-service, carry-out, fast food restaurants and retail cafés, and developed new definitions that better describe the types of restaurants that the town wanted to prohibit.

According to the town’s zoning code, the prohibited food establishments were labeled “formula fast food and formula quick casual restaurants” and “formula fast casual/quick casual restaurants” and “share a common name, trademark, or logo with seven or more other restaurants in the area, region or country,” such as a Burger King or  McDonald’s.

While McDonald’s and Burger King-type food establishments were prohibited by the Town of Eastchester, a full-service chain or franchise restaurant like an Applebee’s or a Buffalo Wild Wings, where customers sit down, are served by wait staff and order from a menu, are permitted.

Petitioners in Tuckahoe want to see a similar ban happen in the village.

Stern said there are concerns that areas in Tuckahoe, specifically mentioning a proposed restaurant that would accompany a Marbledale Road Marriott hotel currently in front of the Planning Board, will turn into a “fast food alley.”

“A lot of these corporations can go buy this land and buy these buildings because this is a very suitable place for fast food-type restaurants,” Stern said. “So there’s more than just what meets the eye here.”

Tuckahoe Mayor Steve Ecklond, a Republican, said he isn’t concerned about a “fast food alley” because there aren’t a lot of open spaces left in the village.

“It’s not happening,” Ecklond said. “If we had empty land, I’d be more concerned. But the hotel would occupy the last open land on Marbledale [Road], and everything else in the village is built on.”

But the mayor and Board of Trustees aren’t dismissing the petitions and the call to amend the zoning code.

“We’re already working on it,” Ecklond said. “But banning fast food restaurants is too generic of a request. What is a fast food restaurant? We need to change the definitions in our zoning code. The ones that are already in existence are so bland and generic because [the zoning code] was adopted 50 years ago or more.”

He said Tuckahoe will follow in Eastchester’s footsteps to establish a ban on fast foods by first deciding which food establishments exist and then deciding which should stay and which should go. Then there needs to be a public hearing before being adopted as a local law. In total, the process of amending the zoning code took Eastchester a year.

As a way to tackle this and other pending issues in the village, Ecklond said the village trustees will meet with Tuckahoe Village Administrator David Burke once a month in a public forum to discuss one topic per month. This will be one of the topics discussed in the coming months.

CONTACT: christopher@hometwn.com

 
Day campers from Beth El Synagogue Center offer up some peach salsa to patrons at the New Rochelle Farmers Market.

City cooks up fresh food at farmers market

New Rochelle Mayor Mayor Noam Bramson, Frankie Rowland of Down to Earth Markets, and community advocates cut the ribbon to celebrate market season.

New Rochelle Mayor Mayor Noam Bramson, Frankie Rowland of Down to Earth Markets, and community advocates cut the ribbon to celebrate market season.

By NICOLE REED
A firetruck pulled up to the New Rochelle Farmers Market on North Avenue on Friday, July 17. The men hopped off and surveyed the scene. Instead of fighting a fire, New Rochelle’s bravest were there to buy fresh fruit and vegetables for the firehouse. As one of the firefighters explained, “It used to be stereotypical that the guys ate bad food, but that’s changed. It’s a younger generation in the firehouse and these guys are health conscious. Now we’re eating healthy and staying healthy. Everything here is always fresh. It’s great that the farmers market is in our backyard.” 

Day campers from Beth El Synagogue Center offer up some peach salsa to patrons at the New Rochelle Farmers Market.

Day campers from Beth El Synagogue Center offer up some peach salsa to patrons at the New Rochelle Farmers Market.

 

The vendors and customers who stopped by the farmer’s market that Friday were accompanied by New Rochelle Mayor Noam Bramson and community advocates for a ribbon cutting ceremony.

Vendors featured at the market include Alex’s Tomato Farm, Dagele Brothers Produce, Meredith’s Country Bakery and the most recent addition: The Cheese Guy. The farmers are from New York state and sell non-GMO produce. The market’s baker brings savory breads and sweet treats to the table, including a line of gluten-free products.

Last Friday, The Cheese Guy, Brent Delman, debuted his goods at the market. According to Delman, he is one of only about a dozen kosher cheese makers in the United States.

Delman, raised in an Italian area outside of Cleveland, Ohio, grew up with a love for cheeses and spent years using his marketing skills to promote specialty food companies. Along the way, his esteem for tradition grew.

“As I got older, tradition became more important to me, from the tradition of handmade cheese to the tradition of keeping a kosher home,” he said.

Then he went to the island of Sardinia in Italy.

“A lot of things came together for me there,” he said. “I love sheep milk cheeses. On Sardinia, their sheep graze in the fields and eat naturally. I learned how to make a sheep milk cheese in this setting.”

When Delman traveled to Italy, he met a farmer whose knowledge was invaluable to The Cheese Guy. When crafting cheese, makers use rennet, a mix of enzymes added to milk to catalyze the curding process. As is custom, the rennet comes from the lining of a calf’s stomach. This method, however, does not meet kosher requirements. The farmer Delman met in Sardinia was willing to use a microbial culture as a replacement for the animal-based rennet.

“Then I was able to use traditional methods and my cheeses could become kosher,” Delman said.

Brent Delman, also known as The Cheese Guy, offers customers samples. Photos/Nicole Reed

Brent Delman, also known as The Cheese Guy, offers customers samples. Photos/Nicole Reed

Vendors at the New Rochelle Farmers Market range in age, and include campers from the Beth El Synagogue Center, also known as the Stars and the Astros, who use inspiration from the farmers’ produce to create a fresh recipe for customers. Recently, they have been offering tastes of homemade peach salsa, and will be cooking up culinary creations from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. now through Friday, Aug. 14.

The New Rochelle Farmers Market, located on North Avenue at Huguenot Park, in front of New Rochelle High School, is managed by Down to Earth Farmers Markets and is open every Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. through Nov. 20.

WGO

What’s Going on in Harrison 6-26-2015

Harrison library events

 

The Harrison Public Library will be closed for renovations until July 2015.

English conversation group

Let’s speak English, non-native speakers. Practice your English and make new friends in an informal, volunteer-led setting and learn about the Harrison library too. There is no need to register or sign up. Group meets on Mondays from 11 a.m. to noon at Uncle Henry’s Bar and Grill, 309 Halstead Ave.

West Harrison library events

Computer help

This program is a one-on-one, 45 minute session on every Tuesday in June, designed to help with computer-related topics such as email, internet searching, Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Publisher, Power Point), download e-books and audiobooks, Google Drive and Ancestry.com. To sign up, call 948-2092.

Story time

Great stories, music and fun for ages 1 to 5. No registration necessary, bring your friends. Mondays from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Train Time

Choo-Choo! Come and play with Thomas and friends. We have sets of toy trains for everyone to enjoy. Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to noon.

Mother Goose Time

Songs, dancing and fun for the little ones ages 3 and under. Thursday from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Crochet and knitting club

Come anytime between 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays to knit and/or crochet, meet new friends, share your skills and knowledge, and have a good time. No registration needed. Bring hooks, needles and yarn or practice with ours. Walk-ins are welcome. Saturdays 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Story time and craft

Listen to stories and create a fun craft with Manhattanville volunteers. Program for ages
3 to 5 on Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to noon.

Harrison Recreation

Pre-team swimming

Come and develop your child’s swimming skills in preparation of joining the Harrison recreation winter or summer swim team. This program meets on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. at the Ron Belmont Pool Complex.

Age: 7 and up

Dates: June 30 to July 30

Days: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

Registration: May 11 to June 12

Check Payable: Town/Village of Harrison

Fee: $150

Lap swimming

Enjoy swimming laps at the Brentwood Pool during the weekday mornings and evenings from June 29 until Aug. 17. Must have a 2015 Harrison recreation ID card or a senior ID card to participate.

Date: Weekdays from June 29 until Aug. 14

Time: 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Junior Soccer League

The Harrison Junior Soccer League is open to boys and girls in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. Every child will be assigned to a team through a draft process. Games will start in early September and end in early November. Games will be played at West Harrison Park, Louis M. Klein Middle School and Purchase Elementary School. Teams will be determined by the middle of August. Kindergarten Kickers/1st Grade Division will be determined in September.

Locations: LMK, Purchase, West Harrison Park

Grades: Kindergarten through eighth grade

Registration: Ends Thursday, June 4

Cost: $55

Payable to: Town/Village of Harrison.
All applications after June 4 will be $75.

Youth football camp

The Harrison varsity football program will be conducting a non-contact youth football camp for kids entering grades 3 through 8 during the 2015-2016 school year. The camp will take place on June 27 and run through June 29 from 1 p.m. through 3 p.m. at Harrison High School.

Camp instructors are the Harrison High School varsity football staff and players. Players will be divided by age for appropriate instruction. All positions will be coached and taught so this is a camp for every boy, regardless of position. For more information, call 949-5265, 670-3179 or visit harrison-ny.gov.

Summer camp

Four-day camps offering numerous sports, arts and crafts, swimming, music and weekly special events. Grades 1 through 8 are eligible to apply. Registration fee is $475, $250 for a second child and $175 for third and subsequent children. Please make check payable to Town/Village of Harrison. If all spots are filled, campers will be placed on a wait list with no guarantee of a spot. Late fee is $50 per child after May 7 and $100 after June 18. Camp starts on June 29 and runs through Aug. 7.

US Sports Institute

Camp and classes are for boys and girls of all abilities, ages 3 through 14. There are daytime and evening classes, plus full day and half day. The full schedule and specific programs can be found online at USsportsinstitute.com or call 866-345-BALL. All registration is done online.

Event rentals

Available at both the West Harrison Senior Annex and the Veteran’s Memorial Building in Downtown Harrison, the building rental fee for events is $450 per 5 hours with a $300 security deposit. Add on additional space at either center for $100 plus an additional $100 security deposit. For questions and available dates call 670-3035. To rent the facility, you must have a 2015 resident identification card.

STEM summer camp for girls

Girls Inc. of Westchester is now accepting applications for their summer science camp, SmarTech. This year’s camp is two weeks long, from Monday, July 27 through Friday, Aug. 8, at Purchase College, SUNY. The camp runs Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications will be accepted for girls entering seventh and eighth grade. Girls applying must be able to commit to attending camp for the full two weeks.

In SmarTech, girls will learn about environmental science, computer coding, and other STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields, they will have the chance to experience college life and academics on Purchase College’s campus, and they will meet women with amazing careers in STEM fields who are changing the world. Because Girls Inc. runs on contributions, a suggested donation is $250 per participator per week, but Girls Inc. is flexible. Partial or full financial aid is available to families who are unable to afford the full fee.

For more information, contact Girls’ Inc.’s office at 419-0764, visit girlsincwestchester.org or email camp director Tara Penny at tpenny@girlsincwestchester.org.

Buy a brick to help Pet Rescue
build its forever home

A walkway of personalized, engraved red bricks will soon lead to the front door of Pet Rescue’s new home in Harrison.
Purchase a brick and add the inscription of your choice to honor, remember or celebrate a special pet or person or to express support for Pet Rescue. Your words will create a lasting memorial that will greet visitors to Pet Rescue for years to come.

This path will be a reminder of the generosity and love for Pet Rescue’s rescues. The path will also fund upcoming renovations to Pet Rescue’s home and further their mission to save helpless animals and find them safe, loving homes.

The size and cost of bricks are:

4” x 8” brick can be inscribed with up to 3 lines/18 characters per line at $150.

8” x 8” brick can be inscribed with up to 6 lines/18 characters per line at $300.

Array of four 8” x 8” bricks can be inscribed with up to 12 lines/36 characters per line at $1,000.

Payment can be by PayPal, or you can mail a check to Pet Rescue, P.O. Box 393, Larchmont, NY 10538.

Pet Rescue is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Your donation is tax deductible as allowed by law. Proceeds will go to Pet Rescue’s Building Fund.

For more information on how to place an
order, send an email to petrescuebricks@gmail.

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