Author Archives: news

Nardone commands the mic at WVOX where he hosts an oldies radio show every Sunday. Photos courtesy clubdennis911.net

DJ reflects on life in the past in book

Nardone commands the mic at WVOX where he hosts an oldies radio show every Sunday. Photos courtesy clubdennis911.net

Nardone commands the mic at WVOX where he hosts an oldies radio show every Sunday. Photos courtesy clubdennis911.net

By JAMES PERO
Dennis Nardone remembers. And he should, considering that his memory, and not any one person, is the main protagonist in his recently self-published book titled “Growing Up in the West End of New Rochelle, New York in the 50’s-60’s: My Life, My Neighborhood.”

In his book, Nardone covers it all.

Whether it’s where he and his friends bought their baseballs, the thrill of playing a game of tackle football in the winter, or the sights and sounds of Italian men chattering while smoking their cigars, between his pages, a sense of nostalgia is always nearby.

“I wrote it because there’s so much history and community,” Nardone says. “Every time I talk to people, I talk about memories in the community and how growing up was different from today.”

By trade Nardone is a DJ, and former 30-year law enforcement officer, but with his acute sense of nostalgia, sometimes he seems more akin to a conjurer than anything else.

But instead of magic, Nardone conjures memories.

“From all over the country, I’ve gotten phone calls from grown men telling me, ‘You did it to me,’” he says in reference to his new book. “‘You put a tear in my eye.’”

It’s not the plot of his recent book that captures Nardone’s audience, it’s the feelings that his iterations—or more accurately reiterations—evoke.

“I got one guy who called me, and he says, ‘I gave the book to my mother who’s 89 years old,’” Nardone, now a resident of Harrison told the Review. “She still lives in the old West [New Rochelle] and she still hasn’t put the book down. She feels like it’s 1960.”

Sentimentality is an emotion that Nardone encounters not infrequently throughout his days. While his most recent artistic venture took the form of an 18-chapter-long book that was published this past May, since 1998 he has worked as a disc jockey for WVOX in New Rochelle and for more than a decade of that time, he has been playing—what else—oldies music from the 1950s and 1960s, doo wop in particular.

Dennis Nardone sits outside of Rock N’ Bagel Café in Harrison, with a hardcover copy of his new self-published book about growing up on the west end of New Rochelle. Photo/James Pero

Dennis Nardone sits outside of Rock N’ Bagel Café in Harrison, with a hardcover copy of his new self-published book about growing up on the west end of New Rochelle. Photo/James Pero

“Collectively, [doo wop] was vocal harmonization, and I relate that to community—people together,” Nardone says. “You got together, you stood on the corner and you sang music. It didn’t matter who you were, what kind of work you did, you just got together; if you could carry a tune, you sang.”

Every Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. he brings listeners—who tune in from all around the country, according to Nardone—a slice of their past, from artists like Dion, to The Regents, and everything in between.

Nardone says that sometimes 40 out of the 50 songs he plays in one, three-hour set will come from requests by people tuning in—a level of connection which has him always coming back for more.

“I like that one-on-one connection,” Nardone says in reference to his attraction to the airwaves. “The only thing between us is air… especially with community radio.”

Don’t be mistaken, though.

Nardone isn’t the only one interested in stirring the pot of days long past. His audience, particularly those who call in, play an equitable role in reflecting on memories of their own.

Dennis Nardone also hosts second show on Saturday during which he plays a wider range of music, including songs from the ‘60s and ‘70s.

Dennis Nardone also hosts second show on Saturday during which he plays a wider range of music, including songs from the ‘60s and ‘70s.

“There are regulars and they want the same song,” Nardone says, “Why? Because there’s some sort of memory attached to it—it was their wedding song, or one when they met their boyfriend or it was a summer beach song that they remember from 60 years ago—it’s amazing. How it puts them right there. And it happens to me as well.”

CONTACT: james@hometwn.com

 
Members of the Mahopac, Ossining and Montrose fire departments were in full force at the fireman’s parade. Photos/Bobby Begun

Time-honored parade celebrates firefighters

Members of the Mahopac, Ossining and Montrose fire departments were in full force at the fireman’s parade. Photos/Bobby Begun

Members of the Mahopac, Ossining and Montrose fire departments were in full force at the fireman’s parade. Photos/Bobby Begun

On July 1, firefighters from across the tri-state region marched through the mile stretch of Mamaroneck Avenue as part of the annual Firemen’s Parade in the Village of Mamaroneck.

The village’s all-volunteer fire department led the way down the avenue from Mamaroneck Avenue School to Harbor Island Park. Inclusive of Westchester firefighters from departments as far as Mahopac, Ossining and Montrose, the parade was also joined by members of Connecticut’s teams of first responders.

The crowd of thousands of Westchester County residents waved and cheered for the bevy of marching firefighters waving American flags. Alongside the firefighters, firetrucks’ sirens blared and a vintage Larchmont fire truck transported Miss Hudson Valley and Miss Westchester throughout the parade.

The sidewalks were jam-packed with kids, who were in awe of firefighters, alongside their parents who remember this time-honored tradition when they were young.

-Reporting by Jackson Chen

The Eastchester Fire District decided to add nearly $60,000 to the Tuckahoe firehouse repairs to replace the entire floor to fix the recently-discovered damaged drainage and waste lines and galvanized water lines. Photo/Chris Eberhart

EFD to replace Tuckahoe firehouse floor

The Eastchester Fire District decided to add nearly $60,000 to the Tuckahoe firehouse repairs to replace the entire floor to fix the recently-discovered damaged drainage and waste lines and galvanized water lines. Photo/Chris Eberhart

The Eastchester Fire District decided to add nearly $60,000 to the Tuckahoe firehouse repairs to replace the entire floor to fix the recently-discovered damaged drainage and waste lines and galvanized water lines. Photo/Chris Eberhart

The Eastchester Fire District will add nearly $60,000 to the Tuckahoe firehouse for repairs to increase the scope of work from a partial replacement of the floor to a full replacement.

Fire Commissioner Peter Incledon, who has been spearheading the project, said originally, the fire district planned to replace the ramp and only half the main floor of the only Tuckahoe firehouse, located at 25 Underhill St., because the other side of the floor was “structurally sound.” Paladino Concrete Creations, a Tuckahoe-based engineering firm that was hired by the fire district, provided an estimate of $225,651 to complete the project.

The fire district, which represents the five firehouses in Eastchester, Bronxville and Tuckahoe, put the project out to bid in April and ultimately hired the Paladino company in May for $172,640. Construction started on June 15.

But during construction, the fire district discovered severely-damaged drainage and waste lines and galvanized water lines that run under the entire length of the floor.

Incledon said replacing the entire floor would be “both prudent and cost effective,” so the fire commissioners convened a special meeting on June 20 and decided to spend an additional $58,669 to fix the water, drainage and sewage lines and replace the rest of the floor, which brings the total cost of the project to $231,316.

“While the total cost is almost $6,000 above our initial estimate, [the] scope is more comprehensive and will likely eliminate the need for repairs well into the future,” Incledon said.

In the meantime, the Tuckahoe firefighters are living in the Bronxville firehouse and are expected to move back in by Aug. 4.

-Reporting by Chris Eberhart

WGO

What’s going on in Rye

Rye library events

Story time

Nursery rhymes, songs and fingerplays, “Granny Jean” Klein, well-versed in early childhood development, introduces babies and toddlers to playful rhymes, songs and puppetry. Parents and caregivers participate with the children at the library and are encouraged to continue the activities at home. Because the program is often a child’s first experience in an audience setting, it is important that adults strive to arrive on time and actively help children focus on the presentation. Open to 6 months to 3-and-a-half-year-olds. Mondays, 10 a.m. for 20 minutes.

Calligraphy for teens

Rye Free Reading Room will hold calligraphy workshops for teens every Monday at 4 p.m., running until July 27. Workshops will be held in the Meeting Room and snacks and supplies will be provided. For more information or to register for the class, call 231-3172.

Family Fun Nights

For for children ages 5 and up and their grown-ups at 6 p.m. on Thursdays throughout the summer. All will pertain to the Summer Reading Program’s theme “Every Hero Has a Story.”

On Thursday, July 16, brothers Lev and Ellis Rosen will share the story behind the creation of “Woundabout,” their new book for children about siblings who are sent to live in a very odd town where any change is feared. Audience members will draw their own versions of the children’s pet capybara, and books will be available for purchase and signing. No registration is necessary. Visit ryelibrary.org for more information about this and the other series’ programs.

 

Long term care talk

Certified long term care specialist Jennifer Lavelli will be at the Rye Free Reading Room on Saturday, July 18, at 11 a.m. to give an overview of what long term care is and is not, review the costs for care in New York and the three ways to pay for it, and to explain why this is such a critically important issue. She will also answer questions. Lavelli is certified and licensed by the State of New York. For more information, visit ryelibrary.org, or call 231-3161.

 

Pain management workshop

Pain affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined, and the financial and side-effects costs of medications are enormous. If you are one of those who suffer, come to the Rye Free Reading Room on Thursday, July 16, at 10 a.m. to learn about natural and safe ways to alleviate pain, such as anti-inflammatory diets, foods that help block pain, manual and laser therapies, and exercises that improve strength without causing injury. Presenter Dr. John Thomas Giudice of Larchmont Wellness has been using natural methods to help people recover from chronic conditions since 1998. Read more on his background on his website LarchmontWellness.com. For more information about the program, visit ryelibrary.org or call 231-3161.

Spanish story times

On Saturdays July 18 and Aug. 1, Bilingual Birdies will be at the library to present a blast of culture, music, and stories in Spanish. All family members will enjoy learning songs and rhymes en Español. Visit ryelibrary.org, or call 231-3162 for more information.

Yoga for kids

On Saturdays July 11 and 25, master Storytime yoga teacher Elisha Simpson will take children on a journey of exploration through body and word as she accompanies folktales from around the world with yoga exercises to give audience members a way to connect and discover their inner world of creativity, body and imagination. Following the stories, there will be a simple related craft. Visit ryelibrary.org, or call 231-3162 for more information.

Science Fun Club

Science teacher Johnda Ferrari is conducting a summer Science Fun Club for children entering third through fifth grade at the Rye Free Reading Room on Fridays, July 10, 17, 24 and 31. The hour-long programs, starting at 4 p.m., will focus on such topics as ocean, bird and insect life and magnetism, and will present learning in a fun way and include hands-on activities like experiments, games, and crafts. Visit ryelibrary.org for specific information about each session and to sign up. Pre-registration is required and opens a week in advance of the program.

Torn paper painting workshop

Join fellow art lovers to try your hand at torn paper painting for a two-session workshop at the Rye Free Reading Room on Saturdays, July 18 and 25, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Torn paper is an unconventional collage technique that is fun, creative and sure to produce beautiful results, even for the person with little or no art experience. The first session will be devoted to preparing papers of all types to be included in your painting.  The next week you will learn how to use the papers to create an art piece. Visit ryelibrary.org, or call 231-3161 for more information.

Rye Arts Center

Summer program registration

A broad range of weekly as well as summer-long programs for kids ages 4 through teens and adults. RAC will provide complete flexibility to keep a child of any age, ability and interest busy with creative fun. Programs begin June 29 and can be combined for a half or full day, by the week or multiple weeks to suit everyone’s schedule.

Classes include: coding, Minecraft 3-D design and printing, film making, LittleBits, MakeyMakey, Scratch animation, circuitry, Arduino, electronics and creative building.

Musical theater workshop weeks will feature opportunities to perform stage favorites “Willy Wonka” and “Little Shop of Horrors.” For tweens, fresh air and fine arts will be on offer with the RAC’s new plein-air painting class for ages 11 to 14.

Traditional fine arts including painting, drawing, cartooning, ceramics, digital photography, writers’ workshops, vocal pop workshops and music instruction are also on offer. For young artists ages 4 to 10, the RAC offers a three-hour-long creative arts immersion morning program.

The summer guide can be found online at ryeartscenter.org. For questions, call 967-0700 or stop in at the main office located at 51 Milton Road, Rye.

Rye Nature Center

Summer camp

The Rye Nature Center offers an adventurous and educational summer program for children aged 3-and-a-half to 15 years old. Set on 47 acres of forest and trails, our camp creates an ideal setting for children to enjoy the outdoors. We offer a hands-on approach to scientific inquiry and give our young naturalists the chance to encounter animals both in the museum and on the property. Registration for summer camp 2015 is now open. For more information, call 967-5150 or email allisonbedosky@ryenaturecenter.org.

Wainright House

Summer Yoga & Movement

Mondays: 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga; 9:30 a.m., EmpowerHour Yoga; 11 a.m., Tai Chi for Health; 7 p.m., Gentle Kundalini & Meditation.

Tuesdays: 8:15 a.m., Deep Flow Yoga; 9:30 a.m., Centered & Energized Yoga; 6:30 p.m., Basic Yoga.

Wednesdays: 7:30 p.m., Sunset Yoga at down at water’s edge.

Thursdays: 9:15 a.m., Kundalini Movement and Mantra; 7 p.m., Fundamentals of Tai Chi Ch’uan.

Fridays: 9:30 a.m., Ayurvedic Yoga; 3:30 p.m., Gentle Yoga (ISHTA).

Medicine Wheel Teachings

Two workshops will be held on Native American ways. Talking with Father Sky: The Role of the Divine Masculine in the Medicine Wheel Teachings. On Sunday, July 12:

Workshop No.1: Who is Father Sky? 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Workshop No.2: Exploring the Sacred Masculine. 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Each workshop costs $35 for Wainwright members, $40 non-member; for both workshops, $60 for members, $70 for non-members. To register call 967-6080 or visit wainwright.org.

Intro to AumHome: Clearing
your space and your self

With Nidhi Huba, B.A., Feng Shui practitioner. Using techniques of  yoga, Feng Shui, dowsing and divination, Nidhi will guide you to center and align your intuition to the energies and guides that will help you learn how to work with basic Feng Shui principles. Wear comfortable clothing for some light yoga. Please bring a journal, floorplan or sketch of your space. As a gift, each participant will receive a pendulum and Feng Shui card from AumHome. Sunday, July 12, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. $60 for members, $66 for non-members. For more information and to register, visit wainwright.org.

Drumming up wellness

Find your rhythm to health with Damon Jackson. Learn how to use different timbal instruments in a circle of rhythm and soul while you: reduce stress and boost the immune system; gain freedom of expression; increase joy through laughter and community and fun. On Fridays July 19 and Aug. 14, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. $20 for Wainright members, $22 for non-members. Register at wainwright.org.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space
is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send
all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
WGO

What’s going on in Harrison

The Harrison Public Library will be closed for renovations until July 2015.

English conversation group

Let’s speak English, non-native speakers. Practice your English and make new friends in an informal, volunteer-led setting and learn about the Harrison library too. There is no need to register or sign up. Group meets on Mondays from 11 a.m. to noon at Uncle Henry’s Bar and Grill, 309 Halstead Ave.

West Harrison library events

Bilingual Story Time

Have some fun in the sun with great stories, music and a craft for ages 1 to 5. In English and Spanish. No registration necessary, bring your friends. Monday, July 13, from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Train Time

Choo-Choo! Come and play with Thomas and friends. We have sets of toy trains for everyone to enjoy. Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to noon.

Mommy & Me Yoga

Come and participate in a special yoga class with your baby. Mats and blankets will be provided or you may bring your own. For babies under 12 months and their mother or caregiver. In the Children’s Room, Tuesday, July 14, 11 a.m. to noon. Call 948-2092 to sign up or for information. Open to all.

Open Play Time

For ages 1 to 5. Come in to the warmth of the library and meet other parents, grandparents, caregivers and children. Make new friends, play, read and have fun with some special toys for this program. Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to noon.

Mother Goose Time

Songs, dancing and fun for the little ones ages 3 and under. Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Crochet and knitting club

Come anytime between 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays to knit and/or crochet, meet new friends, share your skills and knowledge and have a good time. No registration needed. Bring hooks, needles and yarn or practice with ours. Walk-ins are welcome.

Teens Reading Club

Running every Thursday until Aug. 6 from 2:30 p.m. for one hour. Contact the library at 948-2092 for more information.

Mahjong class

Learn mahjong at the West Harrison Library, every Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For beginners and people who need to refresh their skills. For more information, talk to us at the library or call 948-2092.

Harrison Recreation

Lap swimming

Enjoy swimming laps at the Brentwood Pool during the weekday mornings and evenings from June 29 until Aug. 17. Must have a 2015 Harrison recreation ID card or a senior ID card to participate.

Date: Weekdays from June 29 until Aug. 14

Time: 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Junior Soccer League

The Harrison Junior Soccer League is open to boys and girls in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. Every child will be assigned to a team through a draft process. Games will start in early September and end in early November. Games will be played at West Harrison Park, Louis M. Klein Middle School and Purchase Elementary School. Teams will be determined by mid-August. Kindergarten Kickers/1st Grade Division will be determined in September.

Locations: LMK, Purchase ES, West Harrison Park

Grades: Kindergarten through eighth grade

Cost: $55

Payable to: Town/Village of Harrison. All applications after June 4 will be $75.

Summer camp

Four-day camps offering numerous sports, arts and crafts, swimming, music and weekly special events. Grades 1 through 8 are eligible to apply. Registration fee is $475, $250 for a second child and $175 for third and subsequent children. Please make check payable to Town/Village of Harrison. If all spots are filled, campers will be placed on a wait list with no guarantee of a spot. Late fee is $100 after June 18. Camp starts on June 29 and runs through
Aug. 7.

US Sports Institute

Camp and classes are for boys and girls of all abilities, ages 3 through 14. There are daytime and evening classes, plus full day and half day. The full schedule and specific programs can be found online at USsportsinstitute.com or call 866-345-BALL (345-2255). All registration is done online.

Event rentals

Available at both the West Harrison Senior Annex and the Veteran’s Memorial Building in Downtown Harrison, the building rental fee for events is $450 per 5 hours with a $300 security deposit. Add on additional space at either center for $100 plus an additional $100 security deposit. For questions and available dates call 670-3035. To rent the facility, you must have a 2015 resident identification card.

South East Consortium

The Harrison Recreation Department is a member of the South East Consortium for Special Services, Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides year round therapeutic recreation programs for children amd adults with disabilities. South East offers a variety of programs and activities designed to develop physical, social, cognitive and emotional skills. These programs and services are open to all residents in the member communities. We also recognize that there are children and adults who can participate in the regular recreation programs if some accommodations are made in cooperation with SEC on a case-by-case basis. For more information regarding inclusion programs contact the SEC at 698-5232 or visit secrec.org.

STEM summer camp for girls

Girls Inc. of Westchester is now accepting applications for their summer science camp, SmarTech. This year’s camp is two weeks long, from Monday, July 27 through Friday, Aug. 8, at Purchase College, SUNY. The camp runs Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications will be accepted for girls entering seventh and eighth grade. Girls applying must be able to commit to attending camp for the full two weeks.

In SmarTech, girls will learn about environmental science, computer coding, and other STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields, they will have the chance to experience college life and academics on Purchase College’s campus, and they will meet women with amazing careers in STEM fields who are changing the world.

Because Girls Inc. runs on contributions, a suggested donation is $250 per participator per week, but Girls Inc. is flexible. Partial or full financial aid is available to families who are unable to afford the full fee.

For more information, contact Girls Inc.’s office at 419-0764, visit girlsincwestchester.org or email camp director Tara Penny at tpenny@girlsincwestchester.org.

Buy a brick to help Pet Rescue
build its forever home

A walkway of personalized, engraved red bricks will soon lead to the front door of Pet Rescue’s new home in Harrison.

Purchase a brick and add the inscription of your choice to honor, remember or celebrate a special pet or person or to express support for Pet Rescue. Your words will create a lasting memorial that will greet visitors to Pet Rescue for years to come.

This path will be a reminder of the generosity and love for Pet Rescue’s rescues. The path will also fund upcoming renovations to Pet Rescue’s home and further their mission to save helpless animals and find them safe, loving homes.

The size and cost of bricks are:

4” x 8” brick can be inscribed with up to 3 lines/18 characters per line at $150.

8” x 8” brick can be inscribed with up to 6 lines/18 characters per line at $300.

Array of four 8” x 8” bricks can be inscribed with up to 12 lines/36 characters per line at $1,000.

Payment can be by PayPal, or you can mail a check to Pet Rescue, P.O. Box 393, Larchmont, NY 10538.

Pet Rescue is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Your donation is tax deductible as allowed by law. Proceeds will go to Pet Rescue’s Building Fund.

For more information on how to place an order, send an email to petrescuebricks@gmail.com or visit ny-petrescue.org.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space
is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send
all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
WGO

What’s going on in Eastchester

Eastchester Public Library 

“The Ugly Duckling” Puppet Show

Join The PuppeTree for an award-winning performance featuring humorous and unique twists on the traditional tale. For ages 5 and up, participating in one of the reading games. Online pre-registration is required and will begin on Monday, July 6 at 9 a.m. The show is on Monday, July 13, at 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact Teresa Chang at 721-8105 or tchang@wlsmail.org.

Bronxville Public Library

For more events and information, visit bronxvillelibrary.org. Library is closed on Sundays for the summer.

Family Film Friday

Next week’s film is “The Incredibles,” screening July 17 from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. The following week, “Sky High” will be screened at the same time on July 24.

Superpowers practice

Test your superhero speed and strength in this fun activity. Relay races and silly games for ages 3 and up. Registration required, visit the library website to do so and for more information.

Social needlers

Join us for a knitting and crochet hour every Wednesday, 11 a.m. to noon. Chat and socialize while making beautiful items which will be donated to the Visiting Nurse Serivice of New York. For more information, call 337-7680 or email cutchel@wlsmail.org.

Comic book crafts

Teens will be making all sorts of DIY crafts out of recycled comic books. Make anything from bracelets to wallets—anything you can set your mind to. Grades five and up. Wednesday, July 15, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. If you miss this session, a similar craft will be on Friday, July 17 in the Teen Room from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. No registration required.

Tuckahoe Public Library

For the kids

Registration is required for all programs.

Reading Buddies: Do you need some help keeping up with your summer reading? Make an appointment to read with our Learning Ambassadors Renz and Morgan. Tuesdays, July 14, 21 and 28, at 2 p.m. 

Babytime Storytime: Join Miss Ellen for stories and songs for babies. Open to ages birth to 2. Thursdays, July 16, 23 and 30, at 11 a.m .

Computer Buddies: Do you like to play games online? Need someone to play with? Looking for a research buddy? Sign up for a time slot with a Learning Ambassador. Thursdays, July 16, 23 and 30, at 1 p.m.

LEGOS in the Library: Come to the library and create a masterpiece to display. Open to ages 5 to 10. Fridays, July 17 and 31, at 4 p.m.

Preschool Storytime: Join Miss Ellen for stories and songs for preschoolers. Open to ages
2 to 6. Fridays, July 17, 24 and 31, at 11 a.m.

Calling teen gamers

Video games for teens will be offered at the library on Wednesday, July 15, at 4 p.m. Call 961-2121 or visit tuckahoelibrary.org
for more information.

Learn about Shakespeare

“Getting to Know…William Shakespeare” with Gloria Piraino. Saturday, July 18 at 11 a.m. Call 961-2121 to register and for more information.

Knit & Crochet Group

Every Wednesday night at 7 p.m. Be sure to register by calling 961-2121.

Tuckahoe Senior Center

The Tuckahoe senior citizens is an active vital community made up of men and women, 55 years of age and older, who gather Tuesdays and Thursdays from September through July at Father Fata Hall at the Assumption Church in Tuckahoe.

In July, members enjoy a wide range of activities including two line-dancing classes and two Zumba Gold classes, bingo, cards and games, as well as presentations on topics of particular interest: health, legal issues, history, music, culture, and more. Donations are being accepted for jewelry and most gently-used White Elephant items. Also this month, volunteers are sought for the annual bazzar in October.

All of these programs are included in the $20 annual membership fee. Seniors also enjoy monthly luncheons and day trips for an additional fee. The Center will be closed in August and will reopen Tuesday, Sept. 8.

Membership is open to all who consider Tuckahoe and Eastchester their community, including some who live nearby in adjacent areas of Yonkers, Mount Vernon and Scarsdale.

Referrals to important services for older adults are provided by a professional director. The Tuckahoe Senior Center’s operations are overseen by the Senior Citizens Council, a community-based organization established in 1970 to provide professionally-run programs and services for elderly residents of Eastchester, Tuckahoe and Bronxville. For more informan, call 337-8487.

Outdoor film festival

The Westchester Italian Cultural Center will host the Cinema Sotto le Stelle Italian Film Festival at Depot Square in Tuckahoe Thursday nights at 8:30 p.m., July 16 through July 30. The Italian Cultural Center will show “Song’e Napule,” “Matrimonio all’Italiana”  and “Mascagni: Cavalleria Rusticana/Leoncavallo: Pagliacci.” These films are will be shown in Italian with English subtitles. This is a free event and all are welcome. Please bring your own chairs. In case of rain, screenings will be held at the center located at 1 Generoso Pope Place in Tuckahoe. For more information, call 771-8700 or visit wiccny.org.

Bronxville Women’s Club

The Bronxville Women’s Club is located at 135 Midland Avenue in Bronxville.

Friday nights on the patio

Evenings on the patio July 17, 24, and 31 with live entertainment. In case of inclement weather, the evenings will be held inside; no cancellations. For a $5 cover charge for adults, children under 12 free, bring your own picnic. The BWC has tables and chairs. No advance reservations necessary, unless you have a party of more than eight and need a large table. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the entertainment will begin around 7:45 p.m. Donations will be accepted for the performers. For more information, call 337-3252. Lineup of entertainment:

July 17: Before the Bridge: Guitarist Chris Funke joined by friends for an evening of Celtic music.

July 24: The Trans Fran Sisco & Friends Show: Club member and emcee Fran Sisco heads an evening of comedy and music.

July 31: Peter C. North: Mr. North (guitar, ukulele, vocal) performs popular songs from the ‘30s and ‘40s. Joining him for a few numbers will be Joyce Balint (violin).

Film classes

The Bronxville Women’s Club will be holding film classes on Mondays July 20 and Aug. 10.  Doors open at 7 p.m. and the movie begins at 7:15 p.m. Instructor Collin Simon, co-director of PiPE DREAM Theatre and composer who writes music for movies and commercials, will lead a discussion about the movie following its showing. No charge, but donations are accepted. Movie on July 20 is “Jaws,” celebrating its 40th year.  Movie on Aug. 10 is to be announced. No advance reservations needed. The BWC’s auditorium is air conditioned.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
WGO

What’s going on in Mamaroneck

Mamaroneck Public Library

Crafternoons

Calling all Yarn Crafters. Come join library staff and friends who love to create beautiful things. We invite all to bring their current projects to work on and explore ideas. No registration required. Thursday, July 16, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Community Room.

AARP Driver Safety Program

Refresh your skills with the AARP Smart Driver™ Course. Registration is required as space is very limited. Sign up at the reference desk or call 630-5887. Please arrive at 10 a.m. to sign in. The class lasts 6.5 hours. Upcoming dates: Monday, July 13; Monday, August 24; Friday, September 25.

You will learn: defensive driving techniques; proven safety strategies; new traffic laws and rules of the road. Plus, there are no tests to pass. You simply sign up and learn. Upon completion you can save 10 percent on your car insurance and remove up to four points from your license.

AARP charges $20 for members and $25 for non-members. Payment accepted the day of the class only. Checks should be made out to AARP. All payment transactions will be handled directly by the AARP. Course materials are provided. Please bring your own lunch and a pen.

AARP Driver Safety is the nation’s first and largest driver safety course designed specifically for drivers age 50+. However, it can be taken by licensed drivers of all ages. Course participants may be eligible to receive a state-mandated, multi-year discount on their auto insurance premium. For more information visit aarpdriversafety.org.

At Home on the Sound

Figuring out those medical bills

At Home on the Sound, the service organization for residents 60 and over, has invited a NY State licensed insurance broker, Adria Gross, to help clarify medical bills and insurance policies. On Tuesday, July 14, she will discuss the importance of knowing patient rights and understanding what is covered and what is not, including how to compare prices in advance for tests and procedures among various facilities and providers. She will also present options for uninsured or underinsured patients and ways to save on prescription medications.

The program is open to the entire community free of charge at Larchmont Avenue Church’s Community Room, 60 Forest Park Ave. Refreshments at 3:30 p.m., talk starts at 4 p.m.

New membership option

At Home on the Sound is pleased to announce a new membership option. The local nonprofit, dedicated to enhancing the lives of people over 60 in the Larchmont-Mamaroneck area, is introducing an associate membership level effective July 1, 2015.

Associate members will be entitled to participate in the cultural and educational activities offered each month by At Home on the Sound. These programs include: Dine-Abouts; discussion groups (current events, a men’s group, Being Eighty); interest groups (mahjong, foreign languages, book group); organized trips to Broadway shows, concerts, exhibitions, and other cultural destinations;  a weekly gentle yoga class, and more. Associate members will also be eligible for discounts at more than 80 local restaurants and businesses.

Annual fees for an Associate Membership are $190 for an individual or $250 for a household.

At Home on the Sound full members, in addition to the above benefits, are also entitled to:  transportation to appointments, errands and shopping; a network of volunteers to provide small home repairs, odd jobs, and computer help; referrals to vetted professionals in a variety of services areas; home safety assessments; friendly phone calls; trained health advocates for accompaniment to medical appointments and other personalized services. Annual fees for full membership are $370 for an individual or $495 for a household.

For additional information about memberships, or to volunteer, contact At Home on the Sound 899-3150 or visit athomeonthesound.org.

Westchester Sandbox Theatre

The Cat in the Musical

The Cat is back out of his Hat and Horton is once again sitting on an egg in the Westchester Sandbox Theatre’s summer production of “Seussical The Musical.” Come see a wonderful cast filled with young, local talent in this delightful family musical. Only six chances to catch the fun: Seussical performs July 10 to 19, Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m., Sundays at 1 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for children and seniors. WST is located at 931C E. Boston Post Road in Mamaroneck.  For tickets and more information, visit wstshows.com or call 630-0804.

WST Mini Magic Camp

Calling all mini performers in grades K, one and two. Spend a week at the Westchester Sandbox Theatre this summer learning songs and dances from movies and musicals perfect for young friends. Get instruction in voice and dance from fun instructors, and get ready to have a blast on stage. This will give young performers a bite-size camp experience. A special performance for friends and family on will be held on Friday, Aug. 14 at 3 p.m.

When: Aug. 10 to Aug. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: 931C East Boston Post Road, Mamaroneck

Fee: $325 per child, due at the time of registration and non-refundable. A 10 percent discount will be given to siblings. Each family will be required to fill out a medical form.

For registration and more information, visit wstshows.com or call 630-0804.

Blood donation opportunities

Eligible donors are encouraged to choose their day to make a difference. Donors of all blood types—especially those with types O negative, A negative, and B negative—are needed.

Dates to donate blood in Westchester:

Saturday, July 11 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at American Legion Post 1009, 235 Veterans Road, Yorktown Heights.

Tuesday, July 14 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Greenburgh Public Library, 300 Tarrytown Road, Elmsford.

How to donate blood:

Download the American Red Cross Blood Donor app, visit redcrossblood.org, or call 1-800-RED CROSS (733-2767) to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients.

A blood donor card, driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

For more information, visit redcross.org or on Twitter at @RedCross.

Pet Rescue

Turning 1

Join us as we celebrate our first anniversary in our new home Sunday, July 19, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Our new home has allowed us to help so many more animals. Just a few of the wonderful changes we’ve made this year: busy spay/neuter clinic that operates four days a week; weekly meet-and-greets; training and enrichment programs for our dogs; a homey space for our dogs; and much, much more.

To celebrate these changes and to help us change the lives of more animals, we’re kicking off our Pennies for Paws Campaign. Please bring your spare change to the event and help us raise funds.

It’s a guaranteed great time for the entire family: games and raffles with great prizes, refreshments, dog and cat meet-and-greet and facility tours.

Can’t make it but want to help? Make a special anniversary donation. Find out how and more at ny-petrescue.org.

 

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
WGO

What’s going on in New Rochelle

New Rochelle Public Library

The library’s website has a full listing of free programs, dates and times for all ages this summer at nrpl.org. Programs for infants to teens are being held both at the main library and at the Huguenot Children’s Library. Be sure to also check out the return of the annual Disney Hit Parade of family films and the International Music and Dance series. These free programs are made possible by the Friends of the Library and the New Rochelle Public Library Foundation.

Disney adventure films

All ages are invited to be swept away by big screen adventures. The New Rochelle Public Library presents its annual Disney Hit Parade of family films on six Monday evenings in July and August. The Ossie Davis Theater is the venue for the series which will begin at 6 p.m. July 13 with the 1958 version of “The Sign of Zorro.” Running time: 91 minutes. On July 20, “In Search of the Castaway,” released in 1962 will run. Running time: 98 minutes.

International Music and Dance

The International Music and Dance series will continue on Tuesday, July 14 with music from the Andes by Andinay. On Tuesday, July 21, Barynya will perform a spirited sampler of traditional Russian, Cossack, Ukrainian, Russian Jewish, and Russian Gypsy dance, music and songs. Arabian Dance by Aszmara, with music of Armenia, Turkey and Egypt will be performed on Tuesday, July 28. Seating for the free programs is on a first-come, first-served basis, to the capacity of the Ossie Davis Theater. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. More infor-mation at nrpl.org.

Movie on the beach

The Family Film Frenzy returns this summer at various Westchester parks. New Rochelle gets its turn on Wednesday, July 15, with the screening of “Dolphin Tale 2” (rated PG) at Glen Island Beach, starting at 7 p.m. with after-hours swimming, picnicking and relaxing. The movie will begin at sundown. Bring your own picnic or purchase food at the concession stand, bring blankets and chairs. Admission is $5 per person, free for ages 5 and under, includes the movie only. A Westchester County Park Pass is not required for admission. Admission wristbands will go on sale the day of the event at each location and will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis while supplies last. Please note that swimming is only permitted until dark, and all food and cooler guidelines for regular pool hours apply. For more information, visit parks.westchestergov.com or call 864-PARK (7275).

Fishing for kids

The New Rochelle Police Department and the New Rochelle Police Foundation announce the 2015 Community Youth Fishing Program for boys and girls ages 10-15. On Wednesdays July 15 and Aug. 12. Registration is open on a first come, first served basis. Open to New Rochelle residents only and pre-registration is required. Forms can be downloaded at newrochelleny.com/NRPD-CYFP or are available at NRPD Headquarters’ front desk at 475 North Ave. Participants must arrive at the Fort Slocum Road Dock by 9 a.m. and will return at approx. 2 p.m. Lunch, soft drinks and equipment are provided. For additional information contact Detective Fudge at 654-2080.

Blood donation opportunities

Donors of all blood types—especially types O negative, A negative, and B negative—are needed.

When to donate blood: Friday, July 17, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., New Rochelle Public Library, One Library Plaza, Lawton Street.

How to donate blood:

Download the American Red Cross Blood Donor app, visit redcrossblood.org, or call 1-800-RED CROSS (733-2767) to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card, driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. Donors 18 and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements. For more information, visit redcross.org or on Twitter at @RedCross.

New Rochelle Human Society

15th Annual Dog Wash

Bring your four-legged friend to the New Rochelle Humane Society for the 15th Annual Dog Wash on Sunday, July 26, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. outside at 70 Portman Road, New Rochelle. It will be a fun-filled day of pet pampering, microchipping, good food, raffles and vendors. Stop by the “Ask the Trainer” booth, pose for a family portrait and more. Rain date: Sunday, Aug. 2. More vendors are welcome. For more information, email events@newrochellehumanesociety.org or call 632-2925.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
Former Mayor Philip Marraccini is gearing up for another mayoral run to challenge incumbent Mayor Ron Belmont in a Republican primary if all goes according to plan. Photo courtesy LinkedIn

Mayor, deputy mayor seek re-election

Coming as no surprise, the incumbent mayor, Norman Rosenblum, and the incumbent deputy mayor, Lou Santoro, announced their re-election campaign recently. Photos courtesy Lou Santoro

Coming as no surprise, the incumbent mayor, Norman Rosenblum, and the incumbent deputy mayor, Lou Santoro, announced their re-election campaign recently. Photos courtesy Lou Santoro

By JACKSON CHEN
Familiar faces will appear on the Village of Mamaroneck’s Republican ticket in this year’s Board of Trustees election. 

Mayor Norman Rosenblum, 72, and Trustee Lou Santoro, 57, both Republicans, will each be seeking their fourth term as mayor and trustee, respectively.

Rosenblum said the duo is running in 2015 for the same reasons they ran together the first time in 2009. “We didn’t like where the Village of Mamaroneck was when it first started,” the mayor said of his motivation.

Rosenblum added that since taking elected office, the village is now very successful and has been highly rated several times by unbiased national groups, including “CNN Money” and Movoto, a popular real estate website.

“The reason you want to run again, quite honestly, is the positive feedback we get from people,” Rosenblum said. “It’s unbelievable and you keep getting reinforced.”

For the three-term mayor, one of the most impactful changes in the village includes the noticeable amount of development throughout. “There’s a tremendous amount of development that’s going on and we’re doing it very successfully [with] a real key, which I believe is maintaining the character and quality of life in the Village of Mamaroneck,” Rosenblum said.

The mayor added that “any community that doesn’t continue to develop will die from atrophy.”

While new businesses and structures are steadily being constructed, Rosenblum and Santoro, who also serves as deputy mayor, said there’s still some unfinished business that they’d like to see through, and therefore have a desire to continue to serving the village.

Like many municipalities, the village is facing the countywide issue of an extremely worn sewer infrastructure system. According to Rosenblum, the village is always planning ahead on water-related issues by creating a flood mitigation plan, developing a comprehensive infrastructure plan and working with FEMA.

Besides dealing with a failing sewer infrastructure, the mayor and deputy mayor had a hand in pushing forward a large piece of development-friendly legislation, commonly referred to as the transit oriented development, or TOD. The controversial law was aimed at capitalizing on development prospects for areas next to the Metro-North train station in Mamaroneck, but caught the ire of some local residents and their concerns over the potential for increasing flood issues in the area.

Adding onto their three terms of experience in handling village business, both Rosenblum and Santoro have consistently acquired the endorsements of the Republican, Conservative and Independence parties in every election.

Santoro attributes the pair’s success and popularity to being more accessible and hands-on than their counterparts.

“We’re out walking the streets,” Santoro said. “No matter where we go, the gym, restaurants, down by the harbor, people see us and know us.”

In terms of their challengers, Rosenblum said the anti-development sentiments and possibility for conflicts of interests would give the incumbents an advantage. Democratic mayoral candidate Dan Natchez, president of Shore Acres Property Owners Association and a former village trustee, is headlining a ticket that also includes trustee candidate Thomas Burt, a Democratic district leader with experience in class action lawsuits.

The mayor serves a two-year term and is paid an annual stipend of $8,427, while village board trustees also serve two-year terms and are paid $4,590 annually. Election Day is set for Tuesday, Nov. 3 this year.

CONTACT: jackson@hometwn.com

 
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Bronxville graduates ready to move on

Guest speaker Brooks Klimely, who was selected by the graduating class, addresses the crowd and the Class of 2015 during his remarks on June 20.

Guest speaker Brooks Klimely, who was selected by the graduating class, addresses the crowd and the Class of 2015 during his remarks on June 20.

Bronxville High School’s 93rd graduation was wet and rainy. But despite the constant drizzle, the lawn in front of the high school on June 20 was standing room only as family and friends of the Class of 2015 watched the graduates receive their diplomas.

“We all look out into this wonderful audience tonight and realize we, as the Class of 2015, realize are officially moving on,” Class President Brendan Walsh said during his speech. “It’s hard to believe the reality. With this comes quite a bit of uncertainty and unknown, both of which should excite us. Bronxville High School has prepared us in ways we do not know yet, but we will soon learn.”

After Walsh, Student Faculty Legislature President Edward Forst and guest speaker Brooks Klimely, who was picked by the 2015 class, offered their remarks, the graduates, each wearing the traditional Bronxville white dresses and tuxedos, made their way toward Bronxville Board of Education President Denise Tormey, who was holding their diplomas to the familiar graduation tune.

Bronxville Schools Superintendent Dr. David Quattrone speaks before the graduates receive their high school diplomas.

Bronxville Schools Superintendent Dr. David Quattrone speaks before the graduates receive their high school diplomas.

Tormey stepped aside when Jillian Rohr’s name was called to allow her father James Rohr, a member of the Board of Education, to embrace his daughter and present her with her diploma.

“It was special,” James Roark said after the ceremony concluded. “I felt great pride and sadness knowing she will be moving away soon. But everything turned out as spectacular as we expected despite the rain.”

-Reporting by Chris Eberhart