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With bubbles spewing in the background, the joyous grads join their families for hugs and photos.

Bigger and brighter things for small class

With bubbles spewing in the background, the joyous grads join their families for hugs and photos.

With bubbles spewing in the background, the joyous grads join their families for hugs and photos.

Equipped with blaring air horns and shrill whistles, family members and friends cheered for the graduates of the Rye Neck High School Class of 2015.

One by one, the graduating students followed white outlines laid onto the school’s athletic field until they reached the Rye Neck Board of Education President Allen Hodys, who presented each with a handshake and diploma.

Upon returning to their seats, Rye Neck High School Principal Dr. Barbara Ferraro declared each of the 101 students as high school graduates. With that, the air was filled with uniquely-designed black caps tossed up high and bubbles from a machine spewing them out.

Clouds encroached into the sky as the graduates reunited with their loved ones for congratulations. But the Class of 2015 moved away from the rainy weather and towards a brighter future.

-Reporting by Jackson Chen

The graduating seniors that comprise the Mamaroneck High School Class of 2015 begin the procession ceremony on June 24.
Photos/Bobby Begun

Mamaroneck seniors celebrate lasting memories

The graduating seniors that comprise the Mamaroneck High School Class of 2015 begin the procession ceremony on June 24. Photos/Bobby Begun

The graduating seniors that comprise the Mamaroneck High School Class of 2015 begin the procession ceremony on June 24.
Photos/Bobby Begun

Baking sunlight fell onto the ornately decorated black caps proclaiming school pride or future college prospects. Donning black garb and bright smiles, the 2015 senior class of Mamaroneck High School ceremoniously moved towards their next steps of their lives after the June 24 graduation.

The graduates are all smiles on a sunny day in Mamaroneck.

The graduates are all smiles on a sunny day in Mamaroneck.

In the humid weather, more than 300 graduates filed into the plastic chairs set up on the school’s athletic field. Joined by a packed audience of family and friends, the venue was at full capacity to honor the Class of 2015.

A number of the seniors in the high school’s concert band belted tunes from guitars, drums and cymbals before the salutatorian and valedictorian approached the stage to address their fellow peers.

Offering an alternative to the clichéd box of chocolates stance on life, Joe Liberti, a high school social studies teacher at Mamaroneck High School, said that life is more comparable to Sour Patch Kids, a sweet then sour candy. As a piece of advice for the future, Liberti told the graduates to accept the sweet and sour tension that life fluctuates between, ending it with an example of his own.

“Please know that teaching you this year has been very, very sweet,” Liberti said to the graduating class. “Seeing you leave MHS is awfully, awfully sour.”

Contrasting the social studies teacher’s aversion to the overdone box of chocolates cliché, the students ended the ceremony in a stereotypical fashion when their decorated caps took flight as a symbol of new beginnings.

-Reporting by Jackson Chen

A member of the graduating class of 2015 shares a special moment with his family during a tribute to the parents.

Tuckahoe celebrates its senior class

A member of the graduating class of 2015 shares a special moment with his family during a tribute to the parents.

A member of the graduating class of 2015 shares a special moment with his family during a tribute to the parents.

In between the familiar tigers on the front steps of Tuckahoe High School stood the high school’s Class of 2015.

“We’ve accomplished a lot,” Salutatorian Chris Cyran said, “and made it through together and made countless memories along the way.”

During the June 26 commencement ceremony, Valedictorian Nicole Alimena and Cyran made their speeches, a number of scholarships and awards were handed out, Tuckahoe Superintendent of Schools Dr. Barbara Nuzzi, who is retiring this summer, was honored and the graduating class participated in an emotional tribute to their families.

“We are so proud of our graduates and our staff, faculty and administrators,” Tuckahoe Board of Education President Julio Urbina said. “They have all distinguished themselves by having been accepted to more tier one and tier two colleges and universities than ever before. The graduates have also distinguished themselves by giving back to the community through the countless hours of community service they’ve performed over the years.”

As a way to say thank you, the 2015 seniors gave roses to their family members while the senior chorus and band ensemble played in the background, bringing many parents to tears.

The ceremony concluded with the handing out of diplomas as each student was called by name, accepted his or her diplomas from Tuckahoe High School Principal Bart Linehan and posed for a picture.

-Reporting by Chris Eberhart

Proud parents, family members and friends watch the procession of graduates 
at the 2015 Eastchester High School Graduation, which took place 
on the White Plains Road campus.

Eastchester seniors ready for next step

Proud parents, family members and friends watch the procession of graduates  at the 2015 Eastchester High School Graduation, which took place  on the White Plains Road campus.

Proud parents, family members and friends watch the procession of graduates
at the 2015 Eastchester High School Graduation, which took place
on the White Plains Road campus.

The bright, sunny day matched the occasion on June 26 as Eastchester’s senior class received their high school diplomas.

Senior Class President Ryan Winnie and Vice President Olivia Heffernan led the procession of the Class of 2015 to the familiar graduation tune and applause from attendees. Before receiving their diplomas, the graduates, who were joined on the Eastchester High School campus by family and friends, listened to the words of class valedictorian and salutatorian, Eastchester High School Principal Dr. Jeffrey Capuano and Superintendent of Schools Dr. Walter Moran. The ceremony concluded with each graduate being called one-by-one to receive their diplomas that will carry them on to their next phase in life.

-Reporting by Chris Eberhart

 

 

Recent fresh catch on display for sale at the Rye Farmers Market.

Some fresh catch at the local farmers market

Michael and Eileen Decker of Joseph Fisheries.

Michael and Eileen Decker of Joseph Fisheries.

By Nicole Reed
For more than 30 years and counting, Michael Decker’s talent for fishing has attracted a crowd. It started when he was just six years old on a Fire Island dock, as onlookers cheered his hard work for a catch. His mother Eileen says, “He’d spend all afternoon bringing up little snappers. People loved seeing it.”

A few years later, when Michael was 12, his father took him on a two-day fishing trip off Montauk in search of cod. He was a talkative kid and befriended everybody on the boat. He also caught the third largest cod of the trip. It turned out that several of his new friends at sea were journalists. A few days later, stories of Michael’s fishing feat appeared in Newsday, the New York Post and the Daily News.

Today, crowds enjoy the outcome of Michael’s fishing adventures at the Rye Farmers Market. Michael started Joseph Fisheries in 2002, and this year, they joined the market as a full-season vendor. Like all the vendors at the Rye Farmers Market, Joseph Fisheries is a business rooted in family. Michael learned to fish from his grandfather, Joseph, and named his company in his honor. When he got his first fishing vessel, he named it after his two grandmothers: the Virginia and Victoria. Now his mother, Eileen, manages the business. Michael is on the water most days, and recently, he bought a raft to teach his four-year-old boys how to dig for clams.

When Michael and his crew return from a day at sea, they bring in a wide range of fish. These days, fish lovers will find striped bass, sea bass, fluke, flounder, porgy, sole as well as shellfish such as clams and steamers, soft-shelled clams great for steaming.

Captain Mike’s boys clam for the market. Contributed photos

Captain Mike’s boys clam for the market. Contributed photos

Joseph’s Fisheries also brings day boat scallops to the Rye Farmers Market. Regarding the significance of these scallops, Eileen explains that they are dry, fresh and untreated with any chemicals. This is opposed to wet scallops, or sometimes scallops with no descriptor, that can be treated with a chemical to plump them up.

This includes just some of Joseph Fisheries’ fresh catch; it varies week by week. The menu depends on what Mother Nature has to give as well as government restrictions at any given time. New York fishing vessels are required to report their catch to the government every time they return from sea. In response to this information, the authorities permit or prohibit fishing of a species. In late June, Eileen noted, “Bluefish fishing is closed this week, but it should open again after July 1.”

The Deckers are also experts at cooking fish. At the farmers market, they always give out recipes for easy and creative dinner ideas. One of Eileen’s favorites is stripped bass, and she prepares it with the skin on. She marinates the fish in oil, “olive oil for a Mediterranean taste or sesame oil for an Asian approach.”

Then she sprinkles it with salt and pepper and puts it on a hot grill. Keep it on the grill for five to six minutes. Her last step is to flip the fish over to get a little color on the other side.

“We’re finding that more and more people are becoming willing to cook a whole fish,” she says. “We’re all seeing it done so well at restaurants that people want to try it at home.”

In addition to Josephs Fisheries, Rye’s Down to Earth Farmers Market features fruits and vegetables, pasture-raised meat, poultry and eggs, fresh breads and baked goods, prepared foods to go, pickles and even freshly made waffles from Pika’s Farm Table. One last note: it’s cherry season.

The Rye Farmers Market takes place every Sunday, from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., through Dec. 6. The market is located in the parking lot on Theodore Fremd Avenue, behind the Purchase Street stores.

Recent fresh catch on display for sale at the Rye Farmers Market.

Recent fresh catch on display for sale at the Rye Farmers Market.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nardone commands the mic at WVOX where he hosts an oldies radio show every Sunday. Photos courtesy clubdennis911.net

DJ reflects on life in the past in book

Nardone commands the mic at WVOX where he hosts an oldies radio show every Sunday. Photos courtesy clubdennis911.net

Nardone commands the mic at WVOX where he hosts an oldies radio show every Sunday. Photos courtesy clubdennis911.net

By JAMES PERO
Dennis Nardone remembers. And he should, considering that his memory, and not any one person, is the main protagonist in his recently self-published book titled “Growing Up in the West End of New Rochelle, New York in the 50’s-60’s: My Life, My Neighborhood.”

In his book, Nardone covers it all.

Whether it’s where he and his friends bought their baseballs, the thrill of playing a game of tackle football in the winter, or the sights and sounds of Italian men chattering while smoking their cigars, between his pages, a sense of nostalgia is always nearby.

“I wrote it because there’s so much history and community,” Nardone says. “Every time I talk to people, I talk about memories in the community and how growing up was different from today.”

By trade Nardone is a DJ, and former 30-year law enforcement officer, but with his acute sense of nostalgia, sometimes he seems more akin to a conjurer than anything else.

But instead of magic, Nardone conjures memories.

“From all over the country, I’ve gotten phone calls from grown men telling me, ‘You did it to me,’” he says in reference to his new book. “‘You put a tear in my eye.’”

It’s not the plot of his recent book that captures Nardone’s audience, it’s the feelings that his iterations—or more accurately reiterations—evoke.

“I got one guy who called me, and he says, ‘I gave the book to my mother who’s 89 years old,’” Nardone, now a resident of Harrison told the Review. “She still lives in the old West [New Rochelle] and she still hasn’t put the book down. She feels like it’s 1960.”

Sentimentality is an emotion that Nardone encounters not infrequently throughout his days. While his most recent artistic venture took the form of an 18-chapter-long book that was published this past May, since 1998 he has worked as a disc jockey for WVOX in New Rochelle and for more than a decade of that time, he has been playing—what else—oldies music from the 1950s and 1960s, doo wop in particular.

Dennis Nardone sits outside of Rock N’ Bagel Café in Harrison, with a hardcover copy of his new self-published book about growing up on the west end of New Rochelle. Photo/James Pero

Dennis Nardone sits outside of Rock N’ Bagel Café in Harrison, with a hardcover copy of his new self-published book about growing up on the west end of New Rochelle. Photo/James Pero

“Collectively, [doo wop] was vocal harmonization, and I relate that to community—people together,” Nardone says. “You got together, you stood on the corner and you sang music. It didn’t matter who you were, what kind of work you did, you just got together; if you could carry a tune, you sang.”

Every Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. he brings listeners—who tune in from all around the country, according to Nardone—a slice of their past, from artists like Dion, to The Regents, and everything in between.

Nardone says that sometimes 40 out of the 50 songs he plays in one, three-hour set will come from requests by people tuning in—a level of connection which has him always coming back for more.

“I like that one-on-one connection,” Nardone says in reference to his attraction to the airwaves. “The only thing between us is air… especially with community radio.”

Don’t be mistaken, though.

Nardone isn’t the only one interested in stirring the pot of days long past. His audience, particularly those who call in, play an equitable role in reflecting on memories of their own.

Dennis Nardone also hosts second show on Saturday during which he plays a wider range of music, including songs from the ‘60s and ‘70s.

Dennis Nardone also hosts second show on Saturday during which he plays a wider range of music, including songs from the ‘60s and ‘70s.

“There are regulars and they want the same song,” Nardone says, “Why? Because there’s some sort of memory attached to it—it was their wedding song, or one when they met their boyfriend or it was a summer beach song that they remember from 60 years ago—it’s amazing. How it puts them right there. And it happens to me as well.”

CONTACT: james@hometwn.com

 
Members of the Mahopac, Ossining and Montrose fire departments were in full force at the fireman’s parade. Photos/Bobby Begun

Time-honored parade celebrates firefighters

Members of the Mahopac, Ossining and Montrose fire departments were in full force at the fireman’s parade. Photos/Bobby Begun

Members of the Mahopac, Ossining and Montrose fire departments were in full force at the fireman’s parade. Photos/Bobby Begun

On July 1, firefighters from across the tri-state region marched through the mile stretch of Mamaroneck Avenue as part of the annual Firemen’s Parade in the Village of Mamaroneck.

The village’s all-volunteer fire department led the way down the avenue from Mamaroneck Avenue School to Harbor Island Park. Inclusive of Westchester firefighters from departments as far as Mahopac, Ossining and Montrose, the parade was also joined by members of Connecticut’s teams of first responders.

The crowd of thousands of Westchester County residents waved and cheered for the bevy of marching firefighters waving American flags. Alongside the firefighters, firetrucks’ sirens blared and a vintage Larchmont fire truck transported Miss Hudson Valley and Miss Westchester throughout the parade.

The sidewalks were jam-packed with kids, who were in awe of firefighters, alongside their parents who remember this time-honored tradition when they were young.

-Reporting by Jackson Chen

The Eastchester Fire District decided to add nearly $60,000 to the Tuckahoe firehouse repairs to replace the entire floor to fix the recently-discovered damaged drainage and waste lines and galvanized water lines. Photo/Chris Eberhart

EFD to replace Tuckahoe firehouse floor

The Eastchester Fire District decided to add nearly $60,000 to the Tuckahoe firehouse repairs to replace the entire floor to fix the recently-discovered damaged drainage and waste lines and galvanized water lines. Photo/Chris Eberhart

The Eastchester Fire District decided to add nearly $60,000 to the Tuckahoe firehouse repairs to replace the entire floor to fix the recently-discovered damaged drainage and waste lines and galvanized water lines. Photo/Chris Eberhart

The Eastchester Fire District will add nearly $60,000 to the Tuckahoe firehouse for repairs to increase the scope of work from a partial replacement of the floor to a full replacement.

Fire Commissioner Peter Incledon, who has been spearheading the project, said originally, the fire district planned to replace the ramp and only half the main floor of the only Tuckahoe firehouse, located at 25 Underhill St., because the other side of the floor was “structurally sound.” Paladino Concrete Creations, a Tuckahoe-based engineering firm that was hired by the fire district, provided an estimate of $225,651 to complete the project.

The fire district, which represents the five firehouses in Eastchester, Bronxville and Tuckahoe, put the project out to bid in April and ultimately hired the Paladino company in May for $172,640. Construction started on June 15.

But during construction, the fire district discovered severely-damaged drainage and waste lines and galvanized water lines that run under the entire length of the floor.

Incledon said replacing the entire floor would be “both prudent and cost effective,” so the fire commissioners convened a special meeting on June 20 and decided to spend an additional $58,669 to fix the water, drainage and sewage lines and replace the rest of the floor, which brings the total cost of the project to $231,316.

“While the total cost is almost $6,000 above our initial estimate, [the] scope is more comprehensive and will likely eliminate the need for repairs well into the future,” Incledon said.

In the meantime, the Tuckahoe firefighters are living in the Bronxville firehouse and are expected to move back in by Aug. 4.

-Reporting by Chris Eberhart

WGO

What’s going on in Rye

Rye library events

Story time

Nursery rhymes, songs and fingerplays, “Granny Jean” Klein, well-versed in early childhood development, introduces babies and toddlers to playful rhymes, songs and puppetry. Parents and caregivers participate with the children at the library and are encouraged to continue the activities at home. Because the program is often a child’s first experience in an audience setting, it is important that adults strive to arrive on time and actively help children focus on the presentation. Open to 6 months to 3-and-a-half-year-olds. Mondays, 10 a.m. for 20 minutes.

Calligraphy for teens

Rye Free Reading Room will hold calligraphy workshops for teens every Monday at 4 p.m., running until July 27. Workshops will be held in the Meeting Room and snacks and supplies will be provided. For more information or to register for the class, call 231-3172.

Family Fun Nights

For for children ages 5 and up and their grown-ups at 6 p.m. on Thursdays throughout the summer. All will pertain to the Summer Reading Program’s theme “Every Hero Has a Story.”

On Thursday, July 16, brothers Lev and Ellis Rosen will share the story behind the creation of “Woundabout,” their new book for children about siblings who are sent to live in a very odd town where any change is feared. Audience members will draw their own versions of the children’s pet capybara, and books will be available for purchase and signing. No registration is necessary. Visit ryelibrary.org for more information about this and the other series’ programs.

 

Long term care talk

Certified long term care specialist Jennifer Lavelli will be at the Rye Free Reading Room on Saturday, July 18, at 11 a.m. to give an overview of what long term care is and is not, review the costs for care in New York and the three ways to pay for it, and to explain why this is such a critically important issue. She will also answer questions. Lavelli is certified and licensed by the State of New York. For more information, visit ryelibrary.org, or call 231-3161.

 

Pain management workshop

Pain affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined, and the financial and side-effects costs of medications are enormous. If you are one of those who suffer, come to the Rye Free Reading Room on Thursday, July 16, at 10 a.m. to learn about natural and safe ways to alleviate pain, such as anti-inflammatory diets, foods that help block pain, manual and laser therapies, and exercises that improve strength without causing injury. Presenter Dr. John Thomas Giudice of Larchmont Wellness has been using natural methods to help people recover from chronic conditions since 1998. Read more on his background on his website LarchmontWellness.com. For more information about the program, visit ryelibrary.org or call 231-3161.

Spanish story times

On Saturdays July 18 and Aug. 1, Bilingual Birdies will be at the library to present a blast of culture, music, and stories in Spanish. All family members will enjoy learning songs and rhymes en Español. Visit ryelibrary.org, or call 231-3162 for more information.

Yoga for kids

On Saturdays July 11 and 25, master Storytime yoga teacher Elisha Simpson will take children on a journey of exploration through body and word as she accompanies folktales from around the world with yoga exercises to give audience members a way to connect and discover their inner world of creativity, body and imagination. Following the stories, there will be a simple related craft. Visit ryelibrary.org, or call 231-3162 for more information.

Science Fun Club

Science teacher Johnda Ferrari is conducting a summer Science Fun Club for children entering third through fifth grade at the Rye Free Reading Room on Fridays, July 10, 17, 24 and 31. The hour-long programs, starting at 4 p.m., will focus on such topics as ocean, bird and insect life and magnetism, and will present learning in a fun way and include hands-on activities like experiments, games, and crafts. Visit ryelibrary.org for specific information about each session and to sign up. Pre-registration is required and opens a week in advance of the program.

Torn paper painting workshop

Join fellow art lovers to try your hand at torn paper painting for a two-session workshop at the Rye Free Reading Room on Saturdays, July 18 and 25, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Torn paper is an unconventional collage technique that is fun, creative and sure to produce beautiful results, even for the person with little or no art experience. The first session will be devoted to preparing papers of all types to be included in your painting.  The next week you will learn how to use the papers to create an art piece. Visit ryelibrary.org, or call 231-3161 for more information.

Rye Arts Center

Summer program registration

A broad range of weekly as well as summer-long programs for kids ages 4 through teens and adults. RAC will provide complete flexibility to keep a child of any age, ability and interest busy with creative fun. Programs begin June 29 and can be combined for a half or full day, by the week or multiple weeks to suit everyone’s schedule.

Classes include: coding, Minecraft 3-D design and printing, film making, LittleBits, MakeyMakey, Scratch animation, circuitry, Arduino, electronics and creative building.

Musical theater workshop weeks will feature opportunities to perform stage favorites “Willy Wonka” and “Little Shop of Horrors.” For tweens, fresh air and fine arts will be on offer with the RAC’s new plein-air painting class for ages 11 to 14.

Traditional fine arts including painting, drawing, cartooning, ceramics, digital photography, writers’ workshops, vocal pop workshops and music instruction are also on offer. For young artists ages 4 to 10, the RAC offers a three-hour-long creative arts immersion morning program.

The summer guide can be found online at ryeartscenter.org. For questions, call 967-0700 or stop in at the main office located at 51 Milton Road, Rye.

Rye Nature Center

Summer camp

The Rye Nature Center offers an adventurous and educational summer program for children aged 3-and-a-half to 15 years old. Set on 47 acres of forest and trails, our camp creates an ideal setting for children to enjoy the outdoors. We offer a hands-on approach to scientific inquiry and give our young naturalists the chance to encounter animals both in the museum and on the property. Registration for summer camp 2015 is now open. For more information, call 967-5150 or email allisonbedosky@ryenaturecenter.org.

Wainright House

Summer Yoga & Movement

Mondays: 7 a.m., Sunrise Yoga; 9:30 a.m., EmpowerHour Yoga; 11 a.m., Tai Chi for Health; 7 p.m., Gentle Kundalini & Meditation.

Tuesdays: 8:15 a.m., Deep Flow Yoga; 9:30 a.m., Centered & Energized Yoga; 6:30 p.m., Basic Yoga.

Wednesdays: 7:30 p.m., Sunset Yoga at down at water’s edge.

Thursdays: 9:15 a.m., Kundalini Movement and Mantra; 7 p.m., Fundamentals of Tai Chi Ch’uan.

Fridays: 9:30 a.m., Ayurvedic Yoga; 3:30 p.m., Gentle Yoga (ISHTA).

Medicine Wheel Teachings

Two workshops will be held on Native American ways. Talking with Father Sky: The Role of the Divine Masculine in the Medicine Wheel Teachings. On Sunday, July 12:

Workshop No.1: Who is Father Sky? 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Workshop No.2: Exploring the Sacred Masculine. 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Each workshop costs $35 for Wainwright members, $40 non-member; for both workshops, $60 for members, $70 for non-members. To register call 967-6080 or visit wainwright.org.

Intro to AumHome: Clearing
your space and your self

With Nidhi Huba, B.A., Feng Shui practitioner. Using techniques of  yoga, Feng Shui, dowsing and divination, Nidhi will guide you to center and align your intuition to the energies and guides that will help you learn how to work with basic Feng Shui principles. Wear comfortable clothing for some light yoga. Please bring a journal, floorplan or sketch of your space. As a gift, each participant will receive a pendulum and Feng Shui card from AumHome. Sunday, July 12, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. $60 for members, $66 for non-members. For more information and to register, visit wainwright.org.

Drumming up wellness

Find your rhythm to health with Damon Jackson. Learn how to use different timbal instruments in a circle of rhythm and soul while you: reduce stress and boost the immune system; gain freedom of expression; increase joy through laughter and community and fun. On Fridays July 19 and Aug. 14, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. $20 for Wainright members, $22 for non-members. Register at wainwright.org.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space
is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send
all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
WGO

What’s going on in Harrison

The Harrison Public Library will be closed for renovations until July 2015.

English conversation group

Let’s speak English, non-native speakers. Practice your English and make new friends in an informal, volunteer-led setting and learn about the Harrison library too. There is no need to register or sign up. Group meets on Mondays from 11 a.m. to noon at Uncle Henry’s Bar and Grill, 309 Halstead Ave.

West Harrison library events

Bilingual Story Time

Have some fun in the sun with great stories, music and a craft for ages 1 to 5. In English and Spanish. No registration necessary, bring your friends. Monday, July 13, from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Train Time

Choo-Choo! Come and play with Thomas and friends. We have sets of toy trains for everyone to enjoy. Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to noon.

Mommy & Me Yoga

Come and participate in a special yoga class with your baby. Mats and blankets will be provided or you may bring your own. For babies under 12 months and their mother or caregiver. In the Children’s Room, Tuesday, July 14, 11 a.m. to noon. Call 948-2092 to sign up or for information. Open to all.

Open Play Time

For ages 1 to 5. Come in to the warmth of the library and meet other parents, grandparents, caregivers and children. Make new friends, play, read and have fun with some special toys for this program. Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to noon.

Mother Goose Time

Songs, dancing and fun for the little ones ages 3 and under. Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Crochet and knitting club

Come anytime between 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays to knit and/or crochet, meet new friends, share your skills and knowledge and have a good time. No registration needed. Bring hooks, needles and yarn or practice with ours. Walk-ins are welcome.

Teens Reading Club

Running every Thursday until Aug. 6 from 2:30 p.m. for one hour. Contact the library at 948-2092 for more information.

Mahjong class

Learn mahjong at the West Harrison Library, every Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For beginners and people who need to refresh their skills. For more information, talk to us at the library or call 948-2092.

Harrison Recreation

Lap swimming

Enjoy swimming laps at the Brentwood Pool during the weekday mornings and evenings from June 29 until Aug. 17. Must have a 2015 Harrison recreation ID card or a senior ID card to participate.

Date: Weekdays from June 29 until Aug. 14

Time: 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Junior Soccer League

The Harrison Junior Soccer League is open to boys and girls in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. Every child will be assigned to a team through a draft process. Games will start in early September and end in early November. Games will be played at West Harrison Park, Louis M. Klein Middle School and Purchase Elementary School. Teams will be determined by mid-August. Kindergarten Kickers/1st Grade Division will be determined in September.

Locations: LMK, Purchase ES, West Harrison Park

Grades: Kindergarten through eighth grade

Cost: $55

Payable to: Town/Village of Harrison. All applications after June 4 will be $75.

Summer camp

Four-day camps offering numerous sports, arts and crafts, swimming, music and weekly special events. Grades 1 through 8 are eligible to apply. Registration fee is $475, $250 for a second child and $175 for third and subsequent children. Please make check payable to Town/Village of Harrison. If all spots are filled, campers will be placed on a wait list with no guarantee of a spot. Late fee is $100 after June 18. Camp starts on June 29 and runs through
Aug. 7.

US Sports Institute

Camp and classes are for boys and girls of all abilities, ages 3 through 14. There are daytime and evening classes, plus full day and half day. The full schedule and specific programs can be found online at USsportsinstitute.com or call 866-345-BALL (345-2255). All registration is done online.

Event rentals

Available at both the West Harrison Senior Annex and the Veteran’s Memorial Building in Downtown Harrison, the building rental fee for events is $450 per 5 hours with a $300 security deposit. Add on additional space at either center for $100 plus an additional $100 security deposit. For questions and available dates call 670-3035. To rent the facility, you must have a 2015 resident identification card.

South East Consortium

The Harrison Recreation Department is a member of the South East Consortium for Special Services, Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides year round therapeutic recreation programs for children amd adults with disabilities. South East offers a variety of programs and activities designed to develop physical, social, cognitive and emotional skills. These programs and services are open to all residents in the member communities. We also recognize that there are children and adults who can participate in the regular recreation programs if some accommodations are made in cooperation with SEC on a case-by-case basis. For more information regarding inclusion programs contact the SEC at 698-5232 or visit secrec.org.

STEM summer camp for girls

Girls Inc. of Westchester is now accepting applications for their summer science camp, SmarTech. This year’s camp is two weeks long, from Monday, July 27 through Friday, Aug. 8, at Purchase College, SUNY. The camp runs Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications will be accepted for girls entering seventh and eighth grade. Girls applying must be able to commit to attending camp for the full two weeks.

In SmarTech, girls will learn about environmental science, computer coding, and other STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields, they will have the chance to experience college life and academics on Purchase College’s campus, and they will meet women with amazing careers in STEM fields who are changing the world.

Because Girls Inc. runs on contributions, a suggested donation is $250 per participator per week, but Girls Inc. is flexible. Partial or full financial aid is available to families who are unable to afford the full fee.

For more information, contact Girls Inc.’s office at 419-0764, visit girlsincwestchester.org or email camp director Tara Penny at tpenny@girlsincwestchester.org.

Buy a brick to help Pet Rescue
build its forever home

A walkway of personalized, engraved red bricks will soon lead to the front door of Pet Rescue’s new home in Harrison.

Purchase a brick and add the inscription of your choice to honor, remember or celebrate a special pet or person or to express support for Pet Rescue. Your words will create a lasting memorial that will greet visitors to Pet Rescue for years to come.

This path will be a reminder of the generosity and love for Pet Rescue’s rescues. The path will also fund upcoming renovations to Pet Rescue’s home and further their mission to save helpless animals and find them safe, loving homes.

The size and cost of bricks are:

4” x 8” brick can be inscribed with up to 3 lines/18 characters per line at $150.

8” x 8” brick can be inscribed with up to 6 lines/18 characters per line at $300.

Array of four 8” x 8” bricks can be inscribed with up to 12 lines/36 characters per line at $1,000.

Payment can be by PayPal, or you can mail a check to Pet Rescue, P.O. Box 393, Larchmont, NY 10538.

Pet Rescue is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Your donation is tax deductible as allowed by law. Proceeds will go to Pet Rescue’s Building Fund.

For more information on how to place an order, send an email to petrescuebricks@gmail.com or visit ny-petrescue.org.

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