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WGO

What’s going on in Eastchester

Eastchester Public Library 

Teen End of Summer Reading Game Cosplay Party

For those entering grades six and up. The theme is “UNMASK!” Registration is now open and will continue through the end of the game on Wednesday, Aug. 12. Registration required and is done online. Dress as your favorite hero and take part in a summer raffle, trivia games and sundae bar. Contact Elizabeth at 721-8102 or eportillo@wlsmail.org for more information.

End of Read-to-Me Game Party

Join musician Kurt Gallagher for a fun-filled, superpower-charged music concert to end this summer’s Read-to-Me Game. The concert will be followed by the Read-to-Me Game Raffle. Online pre-registration is required, and will begin on Thursday, Aug. 6 at 9 a.m. For Read-to-Me Game participants only. Please register for each attendee including parents/caregivers. Contact Teresa Chang at 721-8105 or tchang@wlsmail.org for more information.

Free technology lessons

If you need help accessing the library’s digital collections, call the Reference Desk at 721-8103 to make an appointment for a free one-on-one technology lesson.

Bronxville Public Library

Book donation drop-off

On Saturday, Aug. 8, 10 a.m. to noon, bring in your gently used books for the ongoing library book sale. All proceeds benefit the Friends of the Bronxville Library. Limit 10 books per patron.

Mahjong

Become an expert player in mahjong, the Chinese game of skill and luck. Geared towards beginners and amateurs to learn the basic rules and strategies. Master a social, competitive game that requires practice, strategy and a little bit of luck. Taught by Regina Klenosky, a player and teacher for decades. On Mondays, 11 a.m. to noon. For more information and to register, call 337-7680 ext. 24 or email bronxvillelibrary@gmail.com.

Teen movie Monday

This week’s screening is “The Incredible Hulk,” screening Aug. 10 at 2:30 p.m. Rated PG-13. Running time: 112 minutes.

Create your own Superhero Shield

Design a shield worthy of a superhero. A drawing and pasting activity for children ages 3 and up. On Monday, Aug. 10 at 3:30 p.m. for one hour.

Social Needlers

Join us for a knitting and crochet hour every Wednesday, 11 a.m. to noon. We chat and socialize while making beautiful items which we donate to the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. For more information, call 337-7680 ext. 63 or email cutchel@wlsmail.org.

Family Film Friday

On Friday. Aug. 14, “Wreck-It Ralph” will be screened at 3:30 p.m. Rated PG. Running time: 101 minutes.

Tuckahoe Public Library

For adults

Learn how to Skype in a workshop on Tuesday, Aug. 11 at 1 p.m. Also, join the knit and
crochet group that meets every Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Please call to register at 961-2121.

Tornadoes, Witches & Rainbows

Part of the Super Science Special Program with the Westchester Children’s Museum. Students will explore story elements from “The Wizard of Oz” as they relate to weather, color, and solids, liquids and solubility. Open to ages 5 to 10. Registration is required. On Tuesday, Aug. 11 at 4 p.m. Visit tuckahoelibrary.org or call 961-2121 to register and for more information.

Reading Buddies

Do you need some help keeping up with your summer reading? Make an appointment to read with our Learning Ambassadors Renz and Morgan. On Tuesday, Aug. 11 at 2 p.m.

Computer Buddies

Do you like to play games online? Need someone to play with? Looking for a research buddy? Sign up for a time slot with a Learning Ambassador. On Thursday, Aug. 13 at 1 p.m.

For teens

Take a peek into the future and try your hand at making a solar race car and test it in a race. On Wednesday, Aug. 12 at 4:30 p.m.

Playland MarketFest

An outdoor curated arts, crafts and packaged food market featuring the best local artisans and vendors in the lower Hudson Valley. At the Fountain Plaza and Boardwalk.

Date: Saturday, Aug. 8

Time: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Weather permitting. Schedule subject to change.

Historical fun for the kids

The staff of Philipse Manor Hall State Historic Site invite children to see and experience some of the ways that leisure time was spent by children their own age more than 200 years ago. From bilbo catchers and whirligigs to tops and graces, children can stop by the Manor to learn about and try out some of the top toys from the 1700s. The event will take place from noon to 2 p.m. on select Thursdays during the summer: Aug. 13, 20 and 27. For more information about Philipse Manor Hall in Yonkers, visit nysparks.com/historic-sites/37/details.aspx.

Westchester Ridge Hill hosts
Movie Mondays

A free family-friendly film series will start this summer on Mondays at 7 p.m. at Westchester Ridge Hill in Yonkers. The series will end on Aug. 10 with “Maleficent” (rated PG). Pre-film festivities begin at 7 p.m. and the films begin at sunset. For more information, visit westchestersridgehill.com.

Blood donation opportunities

Eligible donors are encouraged to choose their day to make a difference. Donors of all blood types—especially types O negative, A negative, and B negative—are needed.

Dates to donate blood:

Thursday, Aug. 13, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., American Legion Hall, 40 Bell Road in Scarsdale.

How to donate blood:

Download the American Red Cross Blood Donor app, visit redcrossblood.org, or call 1-800-RED CROSS (733-2767) to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card, driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17, 16 with parental consent in some states, weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements. For more information, visit redcross.org or on Twitter at @RedCross.

Buy a brick to help Pet Rescue

A walkway of personalized, engraved red bricks will soon lead to the front door of Pet Rescue’s new home in Harrison. Purchase a brick and add the inscription of your choice to honor, remember or celebrate a special pet or person or to express support for Pet Rescue. Your words will create a lasting memorial that will greet visitors to Pet Rescue for years to come.

This path will be a reminder of the generosity and love for Pet Rescue’s rescues. The path will also fund upcoming renovations to Pet Rescue’s home and further their mission to save helpless animals and find them safe, loving homes.

The size and cost of bricks are:

4”x8” brick can be inscribed with up to
3 lines/18 characters per line at $150.

8”x8” brick can be inscribed with up to
6 lines/18 characters per line at $300.

Array of four 8”x8” bricks can be inscribed with up to 12 lines/36 characters per line at $1,000.

Payment can be by PayPal, or you can mail a check to Pet Rescue, P.O. Box 393, Larchmont, N.Y. 10538.

Pet Rescue is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Your donation is tax deductible as allowed by law. Proceeds will go to Pet Rescue’s Building Fund.

For more information on how to place an order, send an email to petrescuebricks@gmail.com or visit ny-petrescue.org.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
WGO

What’s going on in Mamaroneck

Mamaroneck Public Library

For regular programs and events, visit mamaronecklibrary.org.

All Ages Hour

Come in every Saturday at 11 a.m. for stories that will appeal to kids of all ages and their caregivers. Stay or come at 11:30 a.m. to do a craft simple enough for the little kids and creative enough for the big kids. No registration required for both events, and both activities meet in the Children’s Room on the second floor.

Teen Monday Movies

The next movie is “Soul Surfer,” rated PG-13. This is the inspiring true story of teen surfer Bethany Hamilton who lost her left arm in a shark attack and courageously overcame all odds to become a champion again, through her sheer determination and unwavering faith. Showing in the Teen Room on the lower level on Monday, Aug. 10 at 4:30 p.m. Running time: 106 minutes.

Advance Readers’ Copies Raffle

Read books before they are released. Come in and enter to win the entire basket of advance readers’ copies. Enter to win by providing us with your email address. Participants will be signed up to receive information on library programs, events and new books and movies. The drawing will be held on Monday, Aug. 10 to celebrate Book Lover’s Day. Call 698-1250 for more information.

Required Reads Roundtable for teens

Join us in the Mamaroneck Teen Library on select Tuesdays at 4:30 p.m. for one hour of casual conversation followed by discussion, analysis and assignment help.

Dates: Aug. 11 for Middle School Summer Reading Books Review; Aug. 25 for High School Summer Reading Books Review.

Call 698-1250 for titles from the Rye Neck Middle and High schools, Hommocks Middle School and Mamaroneck High School lists. Walk-ins welcome. Light refreshments provided.

Super Summer Kids Movies

“An American Girl: Grace Stirs Up Success” will be screened on Thursday, Aug. 13 at 3:30 p.m. in the Community Room on the lower level. Grace has a real talent for baking and a passion for making delicious dreams come true. When her mom announces a trip to visit relatives in Paris, Grace isn’t so sure about leaving her friends and their cupcake business—that is, until she discovers she’ll get to work with her uncle and cousin in a real French pastry shop. Unrated. Running time: 99 minutes.

Larchmont Public Library

For regular programs and events, visit larchmontlibrary.org.

Saturday Morning Yoga

Start your day with yoga and learn about its history, philosophy and practice. Instructor Damien Germino guides participants to understanding the poses and breathing techniques that will bring peace and beauty to relieve stress while you stretch. Appreciate how to incorporate the exercises and meditations into your daily life to make this year one of contemplation and concentration on centering yourself while finding gratitude and empathy for others. Yoga can have profound positive effects physically when it is practiced regularly as well as provide a foundation for relaxation and spirituality. Saturdays Aug. 8 and 15, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. in the Village Center. No registration required, but please note you will need to bring your own yoga mat or blanket to use on the floor.

Open play mahjong and chess 

Start the week off with a game of mahjong or chess. No instruction is provided and we recommend that you bring your own mahjong or chess pieces. Come join the fun and make some new friends. Meets every Monday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. unless the library is closed.

Heroes Movie Matinee

Who is more of a villain then an evil Disney fairy? Celebrate this famous villain by hearing the story of a vengeful fairy driven to curse an infant princess, only to discover that the child may be the one person who can restore peace to their troubled land. “Maleficent” will be screened on Wednesday, Aug. 12 at 3:30 p.m. in the Michael P. Coords Activity Room. For ages 8 and up. No registration required. Rated PG. Running time: 98 minutes.

New movie screenings

“Far from the Madding Crowd” will be screened at the Village Center on Wednesday, Aug. 12 at 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., and on Thursday, Aug. 13 at 6:30 p.m. No registration required. This timeless story of Bathsheba Everdene’s choices and passions explores the nature of relationships and love, as well as the human ability to overcome hardships through resilience and perseverance. Based on the 1874 novel of the same name by Thomas Hardy. Rated PG-13. Running time: 119 minutes.

LMCTV

Internship program

LMCTV is offering an internship program for interested and qualified students from neighboring area schools. The program includes training in field and studio television production, development of documentary video and news projects. The program provides training in Final Cut Pro, and creates promotional clips for series shows, station promos and public service announcements. Interns can learn hands-on production techniques by assisting with the production of existing shows.

‘The Local Live!’

Tune in to LMCTV’s hyper local, interactive news show Thursday nights at 7:30 p.m. on Cablevision Channel 75, Verizon Channel 36. During the show, join the discussion. Call 381-0150, email thelocallive@lmctv.org or tweet @thelocallive.

Village of Mamaroneck events

Summer on the Avenue

The second Mamaroneck Avenue block party will take place on Thursday, Aug. 13 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. between Halstead Avenue and West Boston Post Road. There will be something for everyone. Admission is free for this family-friendly party. We welcome everyone to the beautiful friendly village with live music and entertainment, crafts, games and activities, including a Sesame Street Learning Town, a mechanical bull ride, an obstacle course and various zones to make time fly. A reminder to all: skateboards and bicycles must be walked; dogs must be on a leash. Alcohol consumption is permitted at tables only. For more information, call 777-7784 or visit summerontheavenue.com.

At Home on the Sound

A forum with Sen. George Latimer

In keeping with its goal to inform senior citizens on a diverse range of topics, At Home on the Sound will host state Sen. George Latimer at its biweekly forum on Tuesday afternoon, Aug. 11.  Representing the 36th District, which covers a wide swath of Westchester, Latimer will present a program called “Albany Update.” Latimer, who is well known for his ease at the microphone, will clarify issues important to senior citizens, as well as take questions.

The event is in Russell Hall, the community room of the Larchmont Avenue Church at 60 Forest Park Ave. Refreshments are at 3:30 p.m.; the forum starts at 4 p.m. For more information, call 899-3150.

Senior citizen programs

The Town of Mamaroneck Senior Center operates under the auspices of the Town of Mamaroneck Community Services Office. The center, located at the VFW Lodge Post 1156, 1288 Boston Post Road, is completely accessible with handicapped restroom facilities and ample parking. The center provides a wide variety of recreational, social and educational activities year round, open to seniors 55 and over.

Most activities are free or have a nominal charge. Some classes have a fee for participants. A monthly calendar of events and programs is available at the center and at townofmamaroneck.org/senior-center. The present membership fee is $35. Non-resident members may pay a higher fee for events or trips held outside the center. Identification and proof of residency is required. For membership information and a calendar of events, call activities coordinator Maria Gallagher at 834-8840.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to acco modate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

WGO

What’s going on in Harrison

Harrison library events 

The Harrison Public Library will be closed for renovations and is scheduled to reopen on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. Visit harrisonpl.org for updates and more information.

 

English conversation group

Non-native English speakers can practice their English and make new friends in an informal, volunteer-led setting and learn about the Harrison library, too. No registration necessary. Group meets Mondays from 11 a.m. to noon at Uncle Henry’s Bar and Grill, 309 Halstead Ave.

Wiggle and Giggle

On Tuesdays with Dawny Dew, there will be two 30-minute sessions from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. The event will include songs, puppets, music and laughs for children ages 6 months to 5 years. Sponsored by the Friends of the Harrison Public Library. Meets at the Harrison Jewish Community Center, 130 Union Ave.

Laptime for Babies

Songs and fingerplays with Miss Claudia. This 20-minute program is specifically designed for non-walkers. Caregiver participation is required. Meets Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at the Harrison Senior Center, 216 Halstead Ave.

Movers and Shakers

Meets Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for 30 minutes of songs, rhymes, finger plays, dancing and fun. For ages 1 to 3. At the Harrison Senior Center, 216 Halstead Ave.

West Harrison library events

Hours starting Monday, Aug. 3: Mondays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; closed on Sundays.

Story Time

Great stories, music and fun for ages 1 to 5. No registration necessary, bring your friends. Mondays at 10:30 a.m. for 30 minutes.

Mommy and Me Yoga

Come and participate in a special yoga class with your baby. Mats and blankets will be provided or you may bring your own. For babies under 12 months and their mother or caregiver. Open to all. On Tuesday, Aug. 11 from 11 a.m. to noon in the Children’s Room. Call 948-2092 to sign up or for more information.

Open Play Time

Come into the library and meet other parents, grandparents, caregivers and children. Open for children ages 1 to 5. Make new friends, play, read and have fun with some special toys. Meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon.

Crochet and knitting class

Want to learn how to knit or crochet a simple scarf? Join our class. Come anytime between 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on Wednesdays. Bring hooks, needles and yarn or practice with ours. Walk-ins are welcome. No registration needed. Call 948-2092 for more information.

Mahjong class

Learn mahjong at the West Harrison Library every Wednesday afternoon from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Classes for beginners and people who need to refresh their skills. For more information, visit the library or call 948-2092.

Mother Goose Time

Songs, dancing and fun for the little ones ages 3 and under. Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Summer Concert Series

On Wednesday, Aug. 12, Teri Lamar & New Company are set to get revelers moving at Ma Riis Park. On Thursday, Aug. 13, Patrick Perone and the Blue Suede Rockers Show Band will perform Elvis’ classics.

Call the Harrison recreation hotline at 670-3039 for more information. All concerts start at 7 p.m. unless stated otherwise.

Harrison Recreation

Download brochures and applications for all recreation programs, unless stated otherwise, at harrison-ny.gov. For more information, questions, suggestions and/or comments, email recreation@harrison-ny.gov.

Soccer camp

For boys and girls grades one through seven. Camp runs Monday, Aug. 10 through Friday, Aug. 14, 9 a.m. to noon at Bernie Guagnini Park on Webster and Adelphi avenues. Children will learn the basics skills of soccer and play games while enjoying a quick dip in the pool. Camp fee is $100. Checks can be made payable to the Town/Village of Harrison.

Swim camp

For kids entering first through third grade. Camp runs from Monday, Aug. 10 through Friday, Aug. 14 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Ron Belmont Pool Complex. Camp will provide children with stroke development and water safety skills, water games, aquatic-related art projects and free swimming. Classes cost $150, checks can be made payable to the Town/Village of Harrison.

Basketball camp

For boys and girls third through eighth grade. Camp runs from Monday, Aug. 17 through Friday, Aug. 21 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Sollazzo Center at 270 Harrison Ave. Camp will help children develop techniques including ball handling, shooting, dribbling and passing, instructed by Gary Chiarella. Camp fee is $220. Checks can be made payable to the Town/Village of Harrison. Children should be sent to camp with their lunches; lunches will be refrigerated.

Event rentals

Available at both the West Harrison Senior Annex and the Veteran’s Memorial Building in downtown Harrison, the building rental fee for events is $450 for 5 hours with a $300 security deposit. Add on additional space at either center for $100 plus an additional $100 security deposit. For questions and available dates call 670-3035. To rent the facility, you must have a 2015 Harrison resident identification card.

Volunteer opportunities

The Harrison Recreation Department has many opportunities for high school students through senior citizens to volunteer with youth programs and senior programs. For more information, call 670-3035.

Harrison Senior Center

Harrison has two very active senior citizen clubs sponsored by the Recreation Department.

The West Harrison Group meets on Thursdays from noon to 3 p.m. at the Leo Mintzer Senior Annex Building, located at 251 Underhill Ave., to discuss items of interest, play bingo and discuss activities coming up in the near future.

The Downtown Group meets every Friday from noon to 3 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Building, located at 210 Halstead Ave.

The membership fee for both groups is $24 per year and refreshments are served at gatherings.

There is also a drop-in center at the Harrison Community Center, at 216 Halstead Ave., Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. where you may enjoy television, cards and socializing.

Come by the Tuesday exercise classes from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the community center.

For more information on recreation and social activities, call the Senior Citizen Center at 670-3000 ext. 3172.

South East Consortium

The Harrison Recreation Department is a member of the South East Consortium for Special Services, Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides year-round therapeutic recreation programs for children and adults with disabilities. South East offers a variety of programs and activities designed to develop physical, social, cognitive and emotional skills. These programs and services are open to all residents in the member communities. Children and adults are also allowed to participate in the regular recreation programs if some accommodations are made in cooperation with SEC on a case-by-case basis. For more information regarding inclusion programs, contact the SEC at 698-5232 or visit secrec.org.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to acco modate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
WGO

What’s going on in Rye

Rye Free Reading Room events

Photography exhibit

World traveler Barbara Paul will display photographs of masked dancing she has witnessed in Africa and Asia at the Rye Free Reading Room from Aug. 5 to 29.  The unique exhibit highlights the animal masked dancers at Festima in Burkina Faso and includes photographs of fascinating rituals and ceremonies in many other African and Asian countries. For more information, go to ryelibrary.org or call 231-3161.

Rockin’ Readers Book Chats

The Rye Free Reading Room invites students entering second and third grade to read and talk about “Tuesday Tucks Me In: The Loyal Bond Between a Soldier and His Service Dog” by Luis Carlos Montalvan, on Saturday, Aug. 22.

The Rockin’ Readers Book Chats, led by the children’s librarian, begin at 3 p.m. and include a discussion, games and refreshments. To participate, sign up online at ryelibrary.org. Go to “Programs and Events,” choose the event and click on the “Register” button. Then pick up copies of the books in the Children’s Room. For more information, call 231-3162.

Teen Animation Workshop

The Rye Free Reading Room invites teens to register for a three-part Teen Animation Workshop taught by Westchester artist Susan Darwin from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays, Aug. 13 and 20. The sessions will include an overview of animation and instruction in the medium of cut-up magazines and images to create “Monty Python-esque” films.

Participants may bring their own images—photos, magazines, posters and newspapers—ready to cut up or select from a supply of images brought by the instructor. Everything else will be provided, but teens should bring a smartphone or digital camera to test out their animations. To get the most out of the workshop, it is necessary to attend all three sessions. Space is limited. Please pre-register via the event description at ryelibrary.org. This series is sponsored by the Auxiliary Board of the Rye Free Reading Room.

Science Fun Club at the Rye library

Science teacher Johnda Ferrari is conducting a Summer Science Fun Club for children entering third through fifth grade at the Rye Free Reading Room. On Fridays, Aug. 14, 21 and 28, the Westchester Children’s Museum will be at the library to conduct its own series of science programs. All the sessions begin at 4 p.m. and last approximately an hour. Some of the topics planned include bird and insect life, magnetism, a look inside the Earth, sharks, DNA and robotic bugs. All combine to present learning in a fun way and feature hands-on activities like experiments, games and crafts. Visit ryelibrary.org for specific information about each session and to sign up. Pre-registration is required and opens a week in advance of the program.

Family Fun Nights at the library

The Rye Free Reading Room has planned a series of Family Fun Nights for children age 5 and up and their grown-ups at 6 p.m. on Thursday evenings throughout the summer. The movie “Big Hero 6” will be shown at the Family Fun Night on Aug. 13. The film is rated PG, running time is one hour and 42 minutes. No pre-registration is necessary. For more information about these programs, visit ryelibrary.org.

“Every Hero Has a Story” Ice Cream Party Grand Finale

Participants in the Rye Free Reading Room’s “Every Hero Has a Story” Summer Reading Program are invited to celebrate their achievements with a Grand Finale at the library on Thursday, Aug. 20, at 6 p.m. The evening will include a “Name That Tune” competition with musical performer Graham Clarke, the awarding of reading certificates and “special prizes,” a raffle and ice cream sundaes with lots of toppings. The event is for Rye Library Summer Reading Program participants only and pre-registration is required to attend. Sign up under the event description at ryelibrary.org, beginning Aug. 13. For more information, call 231-3162.

Storytelling Guild

The Rye Storytellers’ Guild meets at the Rye Free Reading Room one Tuesday evening a month at 6 p.m. to share traditional and personal tales and trade tips on storytelling techniques. On Sept. 1, the group will tell stories about “School Days or Autumn’s Ways.” Listeners, as well as tellers, are always welcome to join the Guild members at their meetings. To learn more, contact Angela at Booksamc@aol.com. For further information, contact Meg Stackpole at 967-0480 or                mstackpole@ryelibrary.org.

Wainwright House

Prenatal Yoga Training

Aug. 13 to Aug. 16: Prenatal Yoga Teacher Training

Led by Sue Elkind. Also open to certified yoga teachers. Students will learn how to support women during their journey into motherhood both physically and emotionally. The training will provide essential techniques such as structuring and sequencing, asana modifications by trimester, key restorative postures, as well as alignment and anatomy. Fee: $600 for members; $650 for non-members.

For more information, call Carol Craig at 967-6080 or visit and register at wainwright.org.

Broadway! 16 Bar Cut Camp

Camp will take place from Monday, Aug. 17 through Friday, Aug. 21 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. for children ages 10 to 13. Performers will learn essential audition tools and techniques, including how to choose the correct 16-32 bar cut to present the best audition ever. Performers will get the opportunity to work with a professional music director and participate in master classes presented by Broadway performers. Camp will conclude with a showcase performance on Aug. 21 at 5 p.m. at Wainwright House. Camp fees are $245 for members and $298 for non-members. Registration is required at wainwright.org.

Kingdom of a Camp

Camp will take place from Monday, Aug. 17 through Friday, Aug. 21 from 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.  for children 6 to 9. This music-and-arts-based, prince and princess-themed camp will begin with a music and movement class. The royal staff will help the princes and princesses make their own crowns, activity books and will enjoy royalty-themed movies during their snack break. Camp will conclude with a short presentation and an official crowning ceremony. No performance or artistic experience necessary. Camp fees are $245 for members and $298 for non-members. Registration is required at wainwright.org.

Feeling nature through Plein
Air Painting

Learn to make stronger compositions and understand how to make good value and color choices with this workshop instructed by Linda Richichi, national and international award-winning artist. Workshop will take place on Aug. 9 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the lawns of Wainwright House. The workshop will include a 30-minute lunch break. Bring your own lunch. Cost of workshop is $150 for Wainwright members and $165 for non-members. Art supplies not included. Register at wainwright.org.

Rye Youth Soccer fall 2015 registration

Rye Youth Soccer will now be accepting online applications for fall intramural teams for coaches, as well as girls and boys grades K through 5. The season will begin on Saturday, Sept. 19 and runs until Saturday, Nov. 14. Complete details on dates and times of the program can be found on Rye Youth Soccer’s website, ryeyouthsoccer.org, under the “Intramural” link on the left side of the home page. For more information, contact registrar Patti Adimari at  pattirys@optonline.net or 967-5273. Scholarships are available upon request.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to acco modate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 

Whitby-Castle-2

Breaking: Yandrasevich gets 1 to 3 in prison

After two adjournments, former City of Rye Golf Club General Manager Scott Yandrasevich will serve a sentence of one to three years. File photo

After two adjournments, former City of Rye Golf Club General Manager Scott Yandrasevich will serve a sentence of one to three years. File photo

Scott Yandrasevich, the disgraced former general manager of the Rye Golf Club, will serve a one-to-three-year sentence in state prison for grand larceny and two counts of falsifying records.

The sentence was handed down on Aug. 6 by Supervising Judge of Criminal Courts Barry Warhit, after he denied another request by Yandrasevich’s lawyer, Kerry Lawrence, to adjourn once again in Westchester County Supreme Court. With three charges, the former general manager will serve each of his one-to-three year sentences at the same time.

While the former manager would have received a lower sentence if he paid back the restitution to the City of Rye, Yandrasevich was unable to come up with the money within the time allowed from the adjournments.

Yandrasevich was originally charged with 10 felony counts of falsifying records and one felony count of grand larceny in the second degree after forming several shell staffing companies which allowed him to embezzle approximately $342,120 over a six-year period, 2007 to 2013, from the city’s golf club.

The former golf club manager, who resigned from the club in January 2013 and was arrested in November of that year, accepted a plea deal on Nov. 6, 2014 and as part of the agreement, he was required to pay restitution to the City of Rye for $271,120 of the money he stole from the golf club and its members.

-Reporting by Jackson Chen

Yandrasevich2

Yandrasevich sentencing adjourned again

The sentencing date for Scott Yandrasevich, the disgraced former general manager of the Rye Golf Club, was pushed back once again to Thursday, Aug. 6.

According to the Westchester County District Attorney’s office, Yandrasevich’s sentencing was adjourned on July 27 for the new date of Aug. 6. This is the second postponing of Yandrasevich’s sentencing, following an original sentencing date of April 9.

Yandrasevich was charged with 10 felony counts of falsifying records and one felony count of grand larceny in the second degree after forming several shell staffing companies which allowed him to embezzle approximately $342,120 over a six-year period, 2007 to 2013, from the city’s golf club.

The former golf club manager, who resigned from the club in January 2013 and was arrested in November of that year, accepted a plea deal on Nov. 6, 2014 and as a part of the agreement, he was required to pay restitution to the City of Rye for $271,120 of the money he stole from the golf club and its members. If he is unable to repay the restitution, Yandrasevich is expected to serve a greater sentence of one to three years in state prison.

When asked why the case was delayed again, the district attorney’s office told the Review there were simply no updates on the case.

-Reporting by Jackson Chen

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Mamaroneck Harbor sees red hue again

Despite an extensive remediation plan in the works, more red clay has spilled into the Mamaroneck Harbor after some rainfall on July 18. Photo/Jim Desmond

Despite an extensive remediation plan in the works, more red clay has spilled into the Mamaroneck Harbor after some rainfall on July 18. Photo/Jim Desmond

By JACKSON CHEN
After some morning rainfall on July 18, another wave of red clay discharge has been spotted spilling into the Mamaroneck Harbor.

The discharge was the result of rainwater washing throughout Harbor Island Park and collecting the crushed stone dust near the Sportime facility that houses red clay tennis courts. Eventually, the rainwater, mixed with the residual stone dust from the clay courts, coursed through the area’s drainage system and into the Mamaroneck Harbor.

“The problem really is the clay courts and it’s the tip of the iceberg,” said Katherine Desmond, the director of the nearby Marine Education Center. Desmond said the clay discharge points to many problems within the park, including the bigger issue of poor village oversight over the park’s drainage system. Desmond’s husband Jim said 20 minutes after the rainfall, the discharge was seen bleeding into the waters of the harbor.

The recent mishap wasn’t the first time the Desmonds caught the tennis court material spilling into the village waters. In August 2014, the marine education center’s director saw the nearby waters of Harbor Island Park hold a rusty orange hue from heavy runoff from the clay courts.

Because Desmond reported it to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, DEC, the village received a violation on Oct. 1, 2014 for allowing the discharge to enter the harbor and eventually seep into the Long Island Sound. According to the DEC, if the violation happened again, the village would be hit with a $37,500 fine for each incident and each day the problem wasn’t solved. While Sportime is the operator of the clay tennis courts, the village ultimately holds ownership of the property and the resulting violations.

Since the August 2014 spills, the more recent July incident is believed to be the only other instance of discharge flowing into the harbor. Despite the Desmonds reporting the incident, the DEC has not issued any fines to the village, according to Village Manager Richard Slingerland. The village manager added that the DEC is giving them a grace period to install a portion of the remediation plan, a required step in addressing the issue.

Slingerland’s remediation plan submitted to the DEC in November 2014 outlined a  bio-retention area that uses soil and vegetation to capture sediment, in addition to an underground water filtration system. However, the plan had to be updated because the DEC expressed concern with the underground system and its potential to be clogged.

Since then, the village manager has updated the plan to include upgraded catch basins and a Stormceptor, a storm water system that retains sediment for later removal and traps oils and debris through floatation.

According to Slingerland, the project is about 95 percent complete, but is missing a key component. Slingerland said the village needs to install the Stormceptor, but is waiting for a textile screen meant to catch most of the pollutants. Despite the village working quickly to install the new remediation plan, the incomplete project allowed another instance of pollutants flowing through the park’s drainage system.

“It won’t be 100 percent, but it’ll catch a huge amount of discharge,” Slingerland said about the textile screens, which are expected to arrive by next week, as of press time. “If the screens were there, it would’ve prevented the discharge.”

Still, there’s some skepticism on the part of Katherine Desmond regarding the village’s efforts. “In terms of the clay [discharges], I don’t see how any kind of better screening is going to be able to stop [its] velocity,” Desmond said.

Besides the Stormceptor contraption, the village also retrofitted the old catch basins to improve performance. Slingerland said the undersized catch basins were upgraded, while the village also unclogged some of them.

In terms of a more immediate solution, Sportime put up their tennis bubbles during the winter season, which virtually prevented the onset of any more discharge. However, according to Assistant Village Manager Dan Sarnoff, the bubbles were taken down by Sportime because of the summer season, which made the courts unplayable without any type of air conditioning.

In exploring a more permanent solution to the clay runoff, there have been ongoing discussions of relocating the Sportime facility to higher ground. When asked if a relocation of the Sportime facility was still being considered, Slingerland said that the option is still on the table but is currently being discussed between the village and Sportime’s attorneys.

Representatives from the DEC could not be reached for comment, as of press time.

CONTACT: jackson@hometwn.com

 
Playland-18

Playland revenue and attendance up

At the end of June, the 2014 and 2015 attendance and revenue numbers for Playland were nearly identical with 134,031 and 135,587 visitors in 2015 and 2014, respectively, and gross revenues of $2.51 million and $2.58 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. The major difference was the July 4 weekend weather which allowed the 2015 numbers to surge.

At the end of June, the 2014 and 2015 attendance and revenue numbers for Playland were nearly identical with 134,031 and 135,587 visitors in 2015 and 2014, respectively, and gross revenues of $2.51 million and $2.58 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. The major difference was the July 4 weekend weather which allowed the 2015 numbers to surge.

By CHRIS EBERHART
Playland had what was considered by many to be a successful season in 2014, and early revenue and attendance figures as of July 19 have already outpaced last year’s numbers. 

Through July 20, 2014, Playland had a total attendance of 230,295 and took in gross revenue of $4.26 million. This year through July 19, which includes the latest numbers obtained by the Review, Playland had a little less than 5,000 more patrons visit the park—235,125—and made nearly $150,000 more—$4.4 million—in gross revenue.

The major difference between this year and last was better weather on July 4—which is generally the busiest day of the year at the amusement park—after a washout in 2014. Through the month of June and heading into the July 4 week, attendance and revenue figures were nearly identical, with 135,587 visitors in 2014 compared to 134,031 visitors in 2015, and a gross revenue of $2.58 million in 2014 and a gross revenue of $2.51 million in 2015.

After July 4, 2015, numbers spiked to 178,998 visitors and gross revenue of $3.35 million, as opposed to 165,353 visitors and a revenue of $3.12 million in 2014.

Westchester County Deputy Parks Commissioner Peter Tartaglia said the numbers indicate about a 6 percent uptick in business over last year.

“Last year, we had the tail end of a hurricane that destroyed most of business on July 4 except for the fireworks show late at night,” Tartaglia said. “This year we had some rain, but it rained early. So from about 4 p.m. on we packed our parking lot and made up a lot of revenue.”

Since hitting a low point in 2013, Playland has been on the upswing in terms of both attendance and revenue, and the driving forces behind that, Tartaglia said, are good weather and an increased number of promotions.

“Weather is always the main factor and will continue to be,” Tartaglia said referring to the amusement park industry, and, in particular, Playland. “Then there are the promotions and discounts that we’ve
been adding.”

Last year, the county started half-priced evenings on Tuesdays and Thursdays at Playland. This year, the county extended that initiative to include Wednesdays and also added a Mother’s Day and Father’s Day promotion, where moms and dads were able to enter the park for free.

“Those are just some of the new promotions,” Tartaglia said.

Playland could see another jump in productivity beginning next year and beyond with Standard Amusements preparing to take over
management of what is the only county-owned amusement park in the nation.

The agreement between the county and Standard was approved by the Westchester County Board of Legislators in June. As part of the 15-year Playland agreement, Standard will invest $25 million—$2.25 million in upfront costs to the county and $22.75 million in direct investments into the 87-year-old amusement park—and pay annual rising payments to the county starting at $300,000. The county will also receive 7.5 percent of the profits once Standard recoups its initial investment.

Currently, Standard and the county are in a co-management period, a time when Standard is shadowing the county in order to better understand how the park is run. The co-management concludes at the end of October, at which point Standard will make a final decision if it wants to stay in or opt out of the agreement.

“So far [the co-management period] has been good,” Tartaglia said. “They’ve been observing and asking questions like ‘Why do you do this?’ or ‘When do you do this?’ So far, it’s been productive.”

CONTACT: christopher@hometwn.com

 
tuckahoehotelf

Pollutants found in Tuckahoe hotel site

The Tuckahoe Planning Board listened to a summary of the results of a remedial investigation that said there are chemicals on-site but not enough to pose a significant threat to human health, so the old quarry property can be developed into a proposed Marriott hotel, pictured. Rendering courtesy Village of Tuckahoe

The Tuckahoe Planning Board listened to a summary of the results of a remedial investigation that said there are chemicals on-site but not enough to pose a significant threat to human health, so the old quarry property can be developed into a proposed Marriott hotel, pictured. Rendering courtesy Village of Tuckahoe

By CHRIS EBERHART
The site of a proposed hotel on Marbledale Road in Tuckahoe is home to an old village quarry and a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation designated Brownfield site. This means the property has potentially hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants that would have to be cleaned up before any construction can commence.

For months, the Tuckahoe Planning Board listened to personal anecdotes about the garbage and harmful chemicals that have been dumped over the years in the old quarry.

Lifelong Tuckahoe resident Anthony Lore, who neighbors the location of the hotel proposal, recalled his high school days working with different contractors and dumping asbestos from pipes and oil burners in the quarry.

Joseph Marinello, another lifelong village resident who lives near the proposed hotel, said he remembers when he worked with his uncle doing work for a plumbing contractor  in the Garth Road section of Eastchester and dumped loads of asbestos in the quarry.

“It worries my heart to see this hotel going [in the quarry site] because I know what’s been dumped in there,” Marinello said.  “I’ve seen it.”

On July 21, the Planning Board got a better feel of what’s in the old quarry after listening to an hour-long presentation from environmental consultant and hydro geologist Bill Canavan, of Hydro Environmental Solutions, Inc., who summarized the results of his company’s remedial investigation of the site. A draft of the final result is being prepared for the DEC and then will be distributed to the Planning Board members and made available to the public.

Until then, the board is working off of Canavan’s synopsis, which said the 109-125 Marbledale Road property is a landfill between 16 and 85 feet thick where the quarry used to be, and is filled with cinders, ash, construction and demolition debris, glass, mattress parts and metal auto parts. The study included tests on the groundwater, surface soil, subsurface soil and soil vapors and found a number of contaminants, such as lead and mercury in the subsurface soil tests, throughout the site.

Despite the discovery of these contaminants, Canavan said the 3.5-acre site can still be developed into the proposed five-story, 163-room Marriott SpringHill Suite hotel.

“Historic landfilling does not pose a significant risk to human health,” Canavan said.

But the site will require a cleanup plan that Canavan said will include a combination of soil excavation and offsite disposal; capping, which involves creating and maintaining a hard surface, usually concrete or asphalt, over the contaminated soil; and vapor mitigation.

“It’s not a clean site, but the horror stories we’ve been hearing…the data indicates otherwise,” Canavan said.

After listening to Canavan’s presentation, the Planning Board decided to publish on the environmental notice bulletin, an online publication of the state DEC that publicizes proposals and actions of land use boards throughout the state, a draft of the conditional negative declaration under the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act, SEQR, which says the project will not have any significant adverse impacts on the environment but conditioned on the project, making DEC and the state Department of Health requirements. This vote opens the public comment period, which ends on Sept. 15, the day of the next scheduled Planning Board meeting. It’s customary in many municipalities to not schedule land use meetings in August.

Come Sept. 15, the Planning Board can either decide to extend the comment period, move ahead with the conditional negative declaration or decide against the negative declaration and force the applicant, Bill Weinberg, of the Eastchester-based Bilwin Development Affiliates, LLC, to complete a full environmental impact statement, EIS, which could take up to a year to complete and cost millions of dollars.

The latter is the route that Planning Board member Melba Caliano called for during the meeting on July 21. Although she voted in favor of posting the conditional negative declaration to the Environmental Notice Bulletin to illicit public comment, Caliano argued in favor of a full EIS.

“Given the history of the site, given the level of public participation, I want a belt and suspenders, and I think this site warrants that kind of thoroughness,” Caliano said. “I think the public’s concerns will be more than addressed then.

“I don’t want to even be thinking about ‘should’ve, would’ve, could’ve.’ I want to go to sleep at night and not think about if I should’ve done something different.”

During the meeting, planning board consultant James Pinto made a suggestion to the board that it should look into hiring its own, independent environmental consultant to help the board sift through the environmental reports, a sentiment that was echoed by Caliano and Marinello.

Tuckahoe Village Administrator David Burke said if the village were to hire the consultant, who would then be paid by Tuckahoe, the developer would set up an escrow account to reimburse the village.

CONTACT: christopher@hometwn.com 

 
At the end of June, the 2014 and 2015 attendance and revenue numbers for Playland were nearly identical with 134,031 and 135,587 visitors in 2015 and 2014, respectively, and gross revenues of $2.51 million and $2.58 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. The major difference was the July 4 weekend weather which allowed the 2015 numbers to surge.

Playland revenue, attendance up over 2014

At the end of June, the 2014 and 2015 attendance and revenue numbers for Playland were nearly identical with 134,031 and 135,587 visitors in 2015 and 2014, respectively, and gross revenues of $2.51 million and $2.58 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. The major difference was the July 4 weekend weather which allowed the 2015 numbers to surge.

At the end of June, the 2014 and 2015 attendance and revenue numbers for Playland were nearly identical with 134,031 and 135,587 visitors in 2015 and 2014, respectively, and gross revenues of $2.51 million and $2.58 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. The major difference was the July 4 weekend weather which allowed the 2015 numbers to surge.

By CHRIS EBERHART
Playland had what was considered by many to be a successful season in 2014, and early revenue and attendance figures as of July 19 have already outpaced last year’s numbers. 

Through July 20, 2014, Playland had a total attendance of 230,295 and took in gross revenue of $4.26 million. This year through July 19, which includes the latest numbers obtained by the Review, Playland had a little less than 5,000 more patrons visit the park—235,125—and made nearly $150,000 more—$4.4 million—in gross revenue.

The major difference between this year and last was better weather on July 4—which is generally the busiest day of the year at the amusement park—after a washout in 2014. Through the month of June and heading into the July 4 week, attendance and revenue figures were nearly identical, with 135,587 visitors in 2014 compared to 134,031 visitors in 2015, and a gross revenue of $2.58 million in 2014 and a gross revenue of $2.51 million in 2015.

After July 4, 2015, numbers spiked to 178,998 visitors and gross revenue of $3.35 million, as opposed to 165,353 visitors and a revenue of $3.12 million in 2014.

Westchester County Deputy Parks Commissioner Peter Tartaglia said the numbers indicate about a 6 percent uptick in business over last year.

“Last year, we had the tail end of a hurricane that destroyed most of business on July 4 except for the fireworks show late at night,” Tartaglia said. “This year we had some rain, but it rained early. So from about 4 p.m. on we packed our parking lot and made up a lot of revenue.”

Since hitting a low point in 2013, Playland has been on the upswing in terms of both attendance and revenue, and the driving forces behind that, Tartaglia said, are good weather and an increased number of promotions.

“Weather is always the main factor and will continue to be,” Tartaglia said referring to the amusement park industry, and, in particular, Playland. “Then there are the promotions and discounts that we’ve been adding.”

Last year, the county started half-priced evenings on Tuesdays and Thursdays at Playland. This year, the county extended that initiative to include Wednesdays and also added a Mother’s Day and Father’s Day promotion, where moms and dads were able to enter the park for free.

“Those are just some of the new promotions,” Tartaglia said.

Playland could see another jump in productivity beginning next year and beyond with Standard Amusements preparing to take over management of what is the only county-owned amusement park in the nation.

The agreement between the county and Standard was approved by the Westchester County Board of Legislators in June. As part of the 15-year Playland agreement, Standard will invest $25 million—$2.25 million in upfront costs to the county and $22.75 million in direct investments into the 87-year-old amusement park—and pay annual rising payments to the county starting at $300,000. The county will also receive 7.5 percent of the profits once Standard recoups its initial investment.

Currently, Standard and the county are in a co-management period, a time when Standard is shadowing the county in order to better understand how the park is run. The co-management concludes at the end of October, at which point Standard will make a final decision if it wants to stay in or opt out of the agreement.

“So far [the co-management period] has been good,” Tartaglia said. “They’ve been observing and asking questions like ‘Why do you do this?’ or ‘When do you do this?’ So far, it’s been productive.”

CONTACT: christopher@hometwn.com