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Colavita,Anthony-7

Town of Eastchester scores highest debt rating

By CHRIS EBERHART
The Town of Eastchester’s fiscal prudence over the years has led to a bump in its Moody’s rating this year.

Moody’s, which rates investors on the basis of risk and the borrower’s ability to make interest payments, catapulted the town to the highest rating a municipality can receive, which in turn lowers interest rates when the town borrows money.

Eastchester’s $3.9 million in general obligation debt was upgraded this year by Moody’s Investors Service, an independent, unaffiliated research company that rates fixed income securities, from 1aa, the second highest rating, to Aaa, because of the town’s “ample reserves and financial flexibility.”

This allows the town board to borrow for tax certioraris and large-scale capital projects at lower interest levels.

Eastchester Town Supervisor Anthony Colavita, a Republican, who has stressed the importance of staying below the state-mandated tax cap levy during municipal budget seasons and keeping costs and spending down over the years, said the town is borrowing at a less than 2 percent interest rate.

“We are very proud of our fiscal record,” Colavita said. “In spite of the economy and complete lack of relief of unfunded state mandates, we’ve remained below the [state-mandated] tax levy cap while securing an increase in the Moody’s rating. We can now borrow money at lower interest rates, which saves a lot of taxpayers’ money, and creates
a sense of confidence in our town board that we are watching every penny we spend.”

The supervisor said, with lower interest rates, Eastchester will look to continue its ball field renovations.

In 2014, the town renovated the Chester Heights field by installing a drainage system in centerfield and adding new bleachers and a new backstop, as well as part one of the renovations to the Parkway Oval field by adding a similar drainage system.

This year, the town allotted $30,000 to add handicap-accessible bleachers to Parkway Oval, and now, Colavita said, with the lower interest rates, the town will look to renovate Leewood Park by adding a new turf field and relocating the tennis courts.

“The upgrade in our Moody’s rating now makes this project more feasible because the debt service is almost nonexistent,” he said.

The Moody’s rating isn’t the only indicator of the town’s sturdy financial footing.

Two years ago, Eastchester scored highly on the Office of the New York State Comptroller’s fiscal stress monitoring system, which reviews all financial information of municipalities to identify local governments and school districts that are in fiscal stress. The lower the score, the less likely there is fiscal stress. Eastchester was in the top 10 percent of the state with a score of 9.6 percent in 2013, which was the last time the town was rated.

CONTACT: christopher@hometwn.com 

 
Sunny the Clown provides balloons for the kids at Harbor Island Park.

A family night of fun

The Village of Mamaroneck’s Parks and Recreation hosted its sixth annual Family Fun Night on Sunday, Aug. 9 at Harbor Island Park from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The night included live music with Frank Pisani and Friends, a campfire and s’mores. Sunny skies made it a perfect day for beach games, kayaking and pedal boat rentals.

-Mamaroneck Review staff

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What’s going on in Eastchester

Eastchester Public Library 

Storytimes to return in October

Our Fall Storytime programs will begin in October this year. More information is available on our website at eastchesterlibrary.org; please note the changes in dates.

New registrants must come to the library and bring proof of the child’s age—copy of passport, birth certificate, etc.—in order to sign up. Returning registrants who participated in Story Time during the Spring of 2015 and had regular attendance may pre-register via email, and will receive an email with instructions on how to do so.

For Preschool Story Time, Eastchester and Tuckahoe library card holders receive priority. Non-residents will be placed on a waiting list; if there are still openings one day prior to the beginning of the program, spots will be offered to those on the waiting list.

Free technology lessons

If you need help accessing the library’s digital collections, call the Reference Desk at 721-8103 to make an appointment for a free one-on-one technology lesson.

Bronxville Public Library

Mahjong

Become an expert player in mahjong, the Chinese game of skill and luck. Geared towards beginners and amateurs to learn the basic rules and strategies. Master a social, competitive game that requires practice, strategy and a little bit of luck. Taught by Regina Klenosky, a player and teacher for decades. On Mondays, 11 a.m. to noon. For more information and to register, call 337-7680 ext. 24 or email bronxvillelibrary@gmail.com.

Teen Movie Monday

This week’s movie is “The Dark Knight,” screening Aug. 17 at 2:30 p.m. Rated PG-13. Running time: 152 minutes.

Social Needlers

Join us for a knitting and crochet hour every Wednesday, 11 a.m. to noon. We chat and socialize while making beautiful items which we donate to the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. For more information, call 337-7680 ext. 63 or email cutchel@wlsmail.org.

Thursday Matinee

“The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” will be screened on Aug. 20 at 1:30 p.m. Rated PG. Running time: 122 minutes.

Family Film Friday

On Friday. Aug. 21, “Monsters vs. Aliens” will be screened at 3:30 p.m. Rated PG. Running time: 94 minutes.

Tuckahoe Public Library

For adults

Learn how to download e-books in a workshop on Monday, Aug. 17 at 6:30 p.m. Get another chance to learn how to download free music with Freegal on Thursday, Aug. 20 at 1 p.m. Also, join the knit and crochet group that meets every Wednesday at 7 p.m. Please call to register at 961-2121.

Books and Coffee

Discuss what the newest and hottest books for the coming colder months over a cup of joe. Meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 19 at 11 a.m.

August Movie Series

The next movie for grown-ups is “5 Flights Up,” which will be screened on Aug. 19 at 1 p.m. Running time: 92 minutes.

Italian Storytime

Bring your bambini for a storytime in italiano. On Thursday, Aug. 20 at 1:30 p.m. Registration required, call 961-2121.

Puzzle Time

Come play with our puzzles and share a story. Open to ages 3 to 6. Friday, Aug. 21 at 3:30 p.m. Registration required, call 961-2121.

Bronxville Free Outdoor Summer Concert

The next concert is That Duo Show, with the Antique Car Show on Thursday, Aug. 20 at Parkway Road and Palmer Avenue beginning at 6:30 p.m. Courtesy of the Bronxville Chamber of Commerce. The entertainment is free, and food from Bronxville eateries is available for purchase.

As a result, street parking along Parkway Road between Milburn Street and Palmer Avenue will be temporarily suspended that afternoon and traffic will be diverted through Leonard Morange Park beginning at 5 p.m.

For more information, contact Susan Miele at 337-6040 or director@bronxvillechamber.com.

Eastchester Recreation

Both programs listed are at Haindl Field, located at Rescigno Drive and Burnham Road in Eastchester. Registration is accepted only at the Recreation Office and can be delivered in person or by mail. Registration for most programs is limited and will be accepted on a first come, first served basis, with in-person registrations processed before mail-in registrations.

If at any time you have any questions or concerns regarding any of our programs, please call our office at 771-3311. The Recreation Department Office is located on the second floor of the Town Hall building at 40 Mill Road; please feel free to stop by on any weekday between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Also visit eastchester.org for more
information.

First Play Soccer Camp

 This soccer camp pushes the fun factor for children. Each day players will enjoy learning soccer skills including dribbling, passing, shooting, tournaments and more. For ages 5 to 8 and 9 to 11. Dates: Monday, Aug. 24 to Thursday, Aug. 27. Three sections are available: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for $179; 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for $149; 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. for $119.

Soccer Squirts

This program involves soccer-based games, promotes the development of motor skills and is an excellent form of exercise. Soccer Squirts includes a wide range of activities that promote balance and coordination with a ball at the feet. The emphasis is on fun and more fun. For ages 3 to 5. Monday, Aug. 24 to Thursday, Aug. 27, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. for $69.

Jewish Music and Arts Festival

The 41st Annual Jewish Music and Arts Festival of Westchester will be held this year on Sunday, Aug. 16 from noon to 6 p.m. at Kensico Dam Plaza in Valhalla, at the north end of the Bronx River Parkway. The festival wraps up Westchester County’s series of cultural heritage celebrations for 2015.

Musical entertainment includes headliner Bobby Doowah, Welt from the Jewish Community of France, Westchester Klezmer, Cantor Randy Herman with members of Kol Hazzanim and Nafshenu Orchestra featuring Israeli dancing by Camp Zeke, and family entertainment, including face painting and balloon artistry. Kosher food will be available for purchase and vendor exhibition will consist of Jewish art and Judaica.

Admission and parking are free. The event will be held rain or shine. Bring blankets or chairs for seating on the lawn.

The Jewish Music and Arts Festival of Westchester is presented by the Westchester Jewish Council, the Westchester Klezmer Program, Kol Hazzanim and the Cantors of Westchester in cooperation with Westchester County Parks. For more information, contact the Westchester Jewish Council at pam@wjcouncil.org or call 328-7001.

 

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to acco modate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
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What’s going on in Mamaroneck

Mamaroneck Public Library

For regular programs and events, visit mamaronecklibrary.org.

All Ages Hour

Come in every Saturday at 11 a.m. for stories that will appeal to all ages of kids and their caregivers. Stay or come at 11:30 a.m. to do a craft simple enough for the little kids and creative enough for the big kids. No registration required for both events, and both activities meet in the Children’s Room on the second floor.

Teen Monday Movies

The next movie is “Spare Parts,” rated PG-13. This drama is inspired by the true story of four undocumented Mexican-American high school students who enter the National Underwater Robotics Competition  and face-off against some of the brightest minds at MIT. Showing in the Teen Room on the lower level on Monday, Aug. 17. Running time: 83 minutes.

Saturday Dance at the Movies

The next dance-themed series of films being screened are in honor of Bob Fosse, American dancer, musical theater choreographer, director, screenwriter, film director and actor. Movies will be screened on Saturday, Aug. 22 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Community Room. Admission is free. For more information, call the reference desk at 630-5888.

AARP Driver Safety Program

Refresh your driving skills with AARP’s Smart Driver course on Monday, Aug. 24 from 10:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. The class will teach drivers defensive driving skills, safety strategies and new traffic laws and rules of the road. The class does not include exams. Upon completion of the class, drivers can save up to 10 percent on their car insurance and remove up to four points from their license. Course materials are provided. Please bring lunch and a pen. Class fees are $20 for AARP members and $25 for non-members. Registration is required and space is very limited. Sign up at the reference desk or call 630-5887.

Larchmont Public Library

For regular programs and events, visit larchmontlibrary.org.

Saturday Morning Yoga

Start your day with yoga and learn about its history, philosophy and practice. Instructor Damien Germino guides participants to understanding the poses and breathing techniques that will bring peace and beauty to relieve stress while you stretch. Appreciate how to incorporate the exercises and meditations into your daily life to make this year one of contemplation and concentration on centering yourself while finding gratitude and empathy for others. Yoga can have profound positive effects physically when it is practiced regularly as well as provide a foundation for relaxation and spirituality. Saturday, Aug. 15 from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. in the Village Center. No registration required, but please note you will need to bring your own yoga mat or blanket to use on the floor.

Open play mahjong and chess

Start the week off with a game of mahjong or chess. No instruction is provided and we recommend that you bring your own mahjong or chess pieces. Come join the fun and make some new friends. Meets every Monday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. unless the library is closed.

Heroes Movie Matinee

Hear the true story of a group of young boys who become sports heroes by winning the 1980 Olympics in hockey. The 2004 hockey-themed Disney movie “Miracle” will be screened on Wednesday, Aug. 19 at 3:30 p.m. in the Michael P. Coords Activity Room. No registration required. Rated PG. Running time: 136 minutes.

Fairy House Craft Time

Children can create fanciful fairy house structures from a variety of art, natural and recycled materials on Tuesday, Aug. 18 at 4 p.m. The purpose of this workshop is to create an opportunity for youngsters to engage in the magic of the realm of fairy and nature in all its wonder. This activity is presented by the Westchester Children’s Museum. To register, visit larchmontlibrary.org/fairy-house-craft-workshop.

Family Time with a therapy dog

Come relax with your family and a therapy dog on Friday, Aug. 21 from 4 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.  Children will learn to practice kindness, patience, respect, compassion and good manners with a loving therapy dog. Children and adults will take turns petting the dog, asking questions and sharing stories. For children ages 3 and up and their caregivers. Register online at larchmontlibrary.org/registration-for-therapy-dog-program.

LMCTV

Internship program

LMCTV is offering an internship program for interested and qualified students from neighboring area schools. The program includes training in field and studio television production, development of documentary video and news projects. The program provides training in Final Cut Pro, and creates promotional clips for series shows, station promos and public service announcements. Interns can learn hands-on production techniques by assisting with the production of existing shows.

‘The Local Live!’

Tune in to LMCTV’s hyper local, interactive news show Thursday nights at 7:30 p.m. on Cablevision Channel 75, Verizon Channel 36. During the show, join the discussion. Call 381-0150, email thelocallive@lmctv.org or tweet @thelocallive.

Free Rabies Vaccination Clinic 

Westchester County residents can bring their dogs, cats and ferrets in for free rabies vaccinations on Saturday, Aug. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the SPCA of Westchester, 590 North State Road, Briarcliff Manor. Call 941-2896, Ext. 10 to schedule a required appointment.

Cats and ferrets must be in carriers and dogs must be on a leash. Aggressive dogs must be muzzled. No examinations will be given and all pets must be supervised by an adult.

Under New York State law, dogs and cats must receive their first rabies vaccine no later than four months after birth. A second rabies shot must be given within one year of the first vaccine, with additional booster shots given every one or three years after that, depending on the vaccine used. Owners who fail to get their pets vaccinated and keep the vaccinations up-to-date may be fined up to $2,000.

Rabies is a fatal disease that is spread through the bite or saliva of infected animals. Those animals most commonly infected are raccoons, skunks, bats and foxes. However, domestic animals such as cats and dogs are also at risk because they can easily contract rabies from wild or stray animals.

A pet that is up-to-date with its rabies vaccinations would only need to get a booster dose of vaccine within five days of the pet’s exposure to a known or suspect rabid animal. Animals not up-to-date with rabies vaccinations would need to be quarantined or potentially euthanized following contact with a rabid or suspect rabid animal.

Senior citizen programs

The Town of Mamaroneck Senior Center operates under the auspices of the Town of Mamaroneck Community Services Office. The center, located at the VFW Lodge Post 1156, 1288 Boston Post Road, is completely accessible with handicapped restroom facilities and ample parking. The center provides a wide variety of recreational, social and educational activities year round, open to seniors 55 and over.

Most activities are free or have a nominal charge. Some classes have a fee for participants. A monthly calendar of events and programs is available at the center and at townofmamaroneck.org/senior-center. The present membership fee is $35. Non-resident members may pay a higher fee for events or trips held outside the center. Identification and proof of residency is required. For membership information and a calendar of events, call activities coordinator Maria Gallagher at 834-8840.

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s

Did you know that every 67 seconds an American is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s? Or that the price tag for this disease, which has no cure, no effective treatment or way in which its course can be slowed, will total $226 billion in the U.S. in 2015 alone? Alzheimer’s affects more people in the U.S. than any of the other top 10 diseases, yet it receives the least financial support.

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the single greatest source of funding for research, education and treatment. Please join us and bring your spirit and energy to a walk near you. To locate a walk, for information on how to form a team, join a team, contribute time or make a donation, visit
alz.org/hudsonvalley.

The 2015 walk for Westchester County is taking place on Sunday, Oct. 4, meeting at the White Plains High School, 550 North St., near the Bryant Avenue entrance. Check-in is at 9 a.m., with a welcome and the walk starting at 10 a.m. To sign up, visit alz.org/walk or call 800-272-3900. For more information, contact Terry Kean at 253-6860 or tkean@alz.org.

 

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to acco modate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
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What’s going on in Harrison

Harrison library events 

The Harrison Public Library will be closed for renovations and is scheduled to reopen on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. Visit harrisonpl.org for updates and more information.

English conversation group

Non-native English speakers can practice their English and make new friends in an informal, volunteer-led setting and learn about the Harrison library, too. No registration necessary. Group meets Mondays from 11 a.m. to noon at Uncle Henry’s Bar and Grill, 309 Halstead Ave.

Wiggle and Giggle

On Tuesdays with Dawny Dew. There will be two 30-minute sessions from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. The event will include songs, puppets, music and laughs for ages 6 months to 5 years. Sponsored by the Friends of the Harrison Public Library. Meets at the Harrison Jewish Community Center, 130 Union Ave.

Laptime for Babies

Songs and fingerplays with Miss Claudia. This 20-minute program is specifically designed for non-walkers. Caregiver participation is required. Meets Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at the Harrison Senior Center, 216 Halstead Ave.

Movers and Shakers

Meets Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for 30 minutes of songs, rhymes, finger plays, dancing and fun. For ages 1 to 3. At the Harrison Senior Center, 216 Halstead Ave.

Calling all artists

Artists who are interested in exhibiting at the Harrison Public Library, located at 2 Bruce Ave., for approximately one month during 2016 are invited to submit samples of their artwork for review by a Juried Art Committee sponsored by the Harrison Council for the Arts.

The samples and related items may be submitted in person at the library on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015 after 9:30 a.m. and must be picked up the next day, Saturday, Oct. 3, after noon. No sign up or appointment required. Two-dimensional art only is eligible. The samples must include two different pieces of the actual art, preferably framed, the artist’s resume and 12 copies, all different, of the artist’s work in the form of 35 mm slides, photos or prints.

All entrants will be notified by Monday, Nov. 16, 2015 via U.S. mail. Ten winners will be selected, plus three alternates. Choice of month will be on a first come, first served basis—February and March are not available.

For more details, visit harrisonpl.org by
going to “Events & Programs/Juried Art Program” or contact Dan Briem at the library at dbriem@wlsmail.org or 835-0324, or Connie Perrotta
at cpcpone@yahoo.com or 315-1922.

West Harrison library events

Hours starting Monday, Aug. 3: Mondays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; closed on Sundays.

Story Time

Great stories, music and fun for ages 1 to 5. No registration necessary, bring your friends. Mondays at 10:30 a.m. for 30 minutes.

Mommy and Me Yoga

Come and participate in a special yoga class with your baby. Mats and blankets will be provided or you may bring your own. For babies under 12 months and their mother or caregiver. Open to all. On Tuesday, Aug. 25 from 11 a.m. to noon in the Children’s Room. Call 948-2092 to sign up or for more information.

Open Play Time

Come into the library and meet other parents, grandparents, caregivers and children. Open for children ages 1 to 5. Make new friends, play, read and have fun with some special toys. Meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon.

Crochet and knitting class

Want to learn how to knit or crochet a simple scarf? Join our class. Come anytime between 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on Wednesdays. Bring hooks, needles and yarn or practice with ours. Walk-ins are welcome. No registration needed. Call 948-2092 for more information.

Mahjong class

Learn mahjong at the West Harrison Library every Wednesday afternoon from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Classes for beginners and people who need to refresh their skills. For more information, visit the library or call 948-2092.

Mother Goose Time

Songs, dancing and fun for the little ones ages 3 and under. Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Harrison Recreation

Download brochures and applications for all recreation programs, unless stated otherwise, at harrison-ny.gov. For more information, questions, sug-
gestions and/or comments, email recreation@harrison-ny.gov.

Basketball camp

For boys and girls third through eighth grade. Camp runs from Monday, Aug. 17 through Friday, Aug. 21 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Sollazzo Center at 270 Harrison Ave. Camp will help children develop techniques including ball handling, shooting, dribbling and passing, instructed by Gary Chiarella. Camp fee is $220. Checks can be made payable to the Town/Village of Harrison. Children should be sent to camp with their lunches; lunches will be refrigerated.

Event rentals

Available at both the West Harrison Senior Annex and the Veteran’s Memorial Building in downtown Harrison, the building rental fee for events is $450 for 5 hours with a $300 security deposit. Add on additional space at either center for $100 plus an additional $100 security deposit. For questions and available dates call 670-3035. To rent the facility, you must have a 2015 Harrison resident identification card.

Volunteer opportunities

The Harrison Recreation Department has many opportunities for high school students through senior citizens to volunteer with youth programs and senior programs. For more information, call 670-3035.

Harrison Senior Center

Harrison has two very active senior citizen clubs sponsored by the Recreation Department.

The West Harrison Group meets on Thursdays from noon to 3 p.m. at the Leo Mintzer Senior Annex Building, located at 251 Underhill Ave., to discuss items of interest, play bingo and discuss activities coming up in the near future.

The Downtown Group meets every Friday from noon to 3 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Building, located at 210 Halstead Ave.

The membership fee for both groups is $24 per year and refreshments are served at gatherings.

There is also a drop-in center at the Harrison Community Center, at 216 Halstead Ave., Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. where you may enjoy television, cards and socializing.

Come by the Tuesday exercise classes from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the community center.

For more information on recreation and social activities, call the Senior Citizen Center at 670-3000 ext. 3172.

South East Consortium

The Harrison Recreation Department is a member of the South East Consortium for Special Services, Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides year-round therapeutic recreation programs for children and adults with disabilities. South East offers a variety of programs and activities designed to develop physical, social, cognitive and emotional skills. These programs and services are open to all residents in the member communities. Children and adults are also allowed to participate in the regular recreation programs if some accommodations are made in cooperation with SEC on a case-by-case basis. For more information regarding inclusion programs, contact the SEC at 698-5232 or visit secrec.org.

Summer Concert Series

The summer concert series ends the season with two more performances. On Wednesday, Aug. 19, rhythm and blues band Reunion will bring the beat on the corners of Thatcher and Halstead Avenues, and on Thursday, Aug. 20, southern rock band Sundown will be playing at the West Harrison Village Green. Both concerts will begin at 7 p.m. Call the Harrison recreation hotline at 670-3039 for more information.

Free Rabies Vaccination Clinic 

Westchester County residents can bring their dogs, cats and ferrets in for free rabies vaccinations on Saturday, Aug. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the SPCA of Westchester, 590 North State Road, Briarcliff Manor. Call 941-2896, Ext. 10 to schedule a required appointment.

Cats and ferrets must be in carriers and dogs must be on a leash. Aggressive dogs must be muzzled. No examinations will be given and all pets must be supervised by an adult.

Under New York State law, dogs and cats must receive their first rabies vaccine no later than four months after birth. A second rabies shot must be given within one year of the first vaccine, with additional booster shots given every one or three years after that, depending on the vaccine used. Owners who fail to get their pets vaccinated and keep the vaccinations up-to-date may be fined up to $2,000.

Rabies is a fatal disease that is spread through the bite or saliva of infected animals. Those animals most commonly infected are raccoons, skunks, bats and foxes. However, domestic animals such as cats and dogs are also at risk because they can easily contract rabies from wild or stray animals.

A pet that is up-to-date with its rabies vaccinations would only need to get a booster dose of vaccine within five days of the pet’s exposure to a known or suspect rabid animal. Animals not up-to-date with rabies vaccinations would need to be quarantined or potentially euthanized following contact with a rabid or suspect rabid animal.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best  to accommodate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
WGO

What’s going on in Rye

Rye Free Reading Room events

Family Story Time Yoga

The last story time yoga and craft theme is “Moving Through the World in Stories” on
Saturday, Aug. 15 from 11 a.m. to noon. Inspired and trained by Sydney Solis of Storytime Yoga, Master Storytime Yoga teacher Elisha Simpson, CKYT, takes children on a journey of exploration through the body and word. Narrated folktales from around the world interpreted through yoga, present children a way to connect and discover their inner world of creativity, bodies and imagination. Children will create a simple craft based on the stories.

Spin-A-Yarn

This open needlework get-together is open to the public. Get information on needlework and partake in some fabric arts. Bring your own project and supplies and work and chat. Meets Tuesdays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Tales for Tots

For kids 18 months to 3-and-a-half years. Simple picture books, finger plays and songs encourage language development and instill a love of stories in children who are learning to talk. This 20-minute activity meets on Thursday, Aug. 20 at 10 a.m. in the Children’s Room. Contact the Children’s Reference Desk at 231-3162 for more information.

Teen Animation Workshop Part 3

The Rye Free Reading Room invites teens to register for a three-part Teen Animation Workshop taught by Westchester artist Susan Darwin on Thursday, Aug. 20 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The sessions will include an overview of animation and instruction in the medium of cut-up magazines and images to create “Monty Python-esque” films.

Participants may bring their own images—photos, magazines, posters and newspapers—ready to cut up or select from a supply of images brought by the instructor. Everything else will be provided, but teens should bring a smartphone or digital camera to test out their animations. To get the most out of the workshop, it is necessary to attend all three sessions. Space is limited. Please pre-register via the event description at ryelibrary.org. This series is sponsored by the Auxiliary Board of the Rye Free Reading Room.

Science Fun Club at the Rye library

Science teacher Johnda Ferrari is conducting a Summer Science Fun Club for children entering third through fifth grade at the Rye Free Reading Room. Visit ryelibrary.org for specific information about each session and to sign up. Pre-registration is required and opens a week in advance of the program. The Westchester Children’s Museum will be at the library to conduct its own series of science programs. The session begins at 4 p.m. and will last approximately an hour in the Meeting Room. For grades three to five.

On Friday, Aug. 21, “DNA Detectives” will be the theme. Lab coats, goggles and lab equipment will be provided as kids are guided through the scientific method of extracting DNA strands from strawberry cells. Pre-registration is required for this event. Registration begins Friday, Aug. 14.

Rockin’ Readers Book Chats

The Rye Free Reading Room invites students entering second and third grade to read and talk about “Tuesday Tucks Me In: The Loyal Bond Between a Soldier and His Service Dog” by Luis Carlos Montalvan on Saturday, Aug. 22.

The Rockin’ Readers Book Chats, led by the children’s librarian, begin at 3 p.m. and include a discussion, games and refreshments. To participate, sign up online at ryelibrary.org. Go to “Programs and Events,” choose the event and click on the “Register” button. Then pick up copies of the books in the Children’s Room.
For more information, call 231-3162.

‘Every Hero Has a Story’ Ice Cream Party Grand Finale

Participants in the Rye Free Reading Room’s “Every Hero Has a Story” Summer Reading Program are invited to celebrate their achievements with a Grand Finale at the library on Thursday, Aug. 20, at 6 p.m. The evening will include a “Name That Tune” competition with musical performer Graham Clarke, the awarding of reading certificates and “special prizes,” a raffle and ice cream sundaes with lots of toppings. The event is for Rye Library Summer Reading Program participants only and pre-registration is required to attend. Sign up under the event description at ryelibrary.org, beginning Aug. 13. For more information, call 231-3162.

Storytelling Guild

The Rye Storytellers’ Guild meets at the Rye Free Reading Room one Tuesday evening a month at 6 p.m. to share traditional and personal tales and trade tips on storytelling techniques. On Sept. 1, the group will tell stories about “School Days or Autumn’s Ways.” Listeners, as well as tellers, are always welcome to join the Guild members at their meetings. To learn more, contact Angela at Booksamc@aol.com. For further information, contact Meg Stackpole at 967-0480 or                mstackpole@ryelibrary.org.

Wainwright House

Broadway! 16 Bar Cut Camp

Camp will take place from Monday, Aug. 17 through Friday, Aug. 21 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. for children ages 10 to 13. Performers will learn essential audition tools and techniques, including how to choose the correct 16-32 bar cut to present the best audition ever. Performers will get the opportunity to work with a professional music director and participate in master classes presented by Broadway performers. Camp will conclude with a showcase performance on Aug. 21 at 5 p.m. at Wainwright House. Camp fees are $245 for members and $298 for non-members. Registration is required at wainwright.org.

Kingdom of a Camp

Camp will take place from Monday, Aug. 17 through Friday, Aug. 21 from 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.  for children 6 to 9. This music-and-arts-based, prince and princess-themed camp will begin with a music and movement class. The royal staff will help the princes and princesses make their own crowns, activity books and will enjoy royalty-themed movies during their snack break. Camp will conclude with a short presentation and an official crowning ceremony. No performance or artistic experience necessary. Camp fees are $245 for members and $298 for non-members. Registration is required at
wainwright.org.

Health and Wellness Expo

Sample some of the 70+ classes offered this fall. Five dollar mini classes in creativity, yoga and movement spirituality, health, wellness, and the environment. There will be shop holistic vendors and practitioners in reflexology, astrology, chakra, homeopathy and psychic/medium available for appointments.

Free keynote speaker and music performance by Taikasin Ghosthorse. The expo will take place on Sunday, Sept. 13 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Lunch by Butler Bros. Register at wainwright.org

Rye Youth Soccer fall 2015 registration

Rye Youth Soccer will now be accepting online applications for fall intramural teams for coaches, as well as girls and boys grades K through 5. The season will begin on Saturday, Sept. 19 and runs until Saturday, Nov. 14. Complete details on dates and times of the program can be found on Rye Youth Soccer’s website, ryeyouthsoccer.org, under the “Intramural” link on the left side of the home page. For more information, contact registrar Patti Adimari at pattirys@optonline.net or 967-5273. Scholarships are available upon request.

SPRYE

Change of location notice

SPRYE is excited to announce its move into expanded office space at 1 Gateway Plaza in Port Chester. its new office is centrally located within the area it serves—Harrison, Port Chester, Rye and Rye Brook. It looks forward to serving a growing number of older adults as it enter its fifth year of operation.

SPRYE is grateful to the Osborn Retirement Community for their donation of office space over the last four years. Their generosity was key to growth and sustainability.

Prospective members and volunteers can
call 481-5706 or email director@sprye.org.

SPRYE’s mailing address: P.O. Box 748,
Rye, N.Y. 10580

Rye Playland

On Saturday, Aug. 22, the Read Wildlife Sanctuary at Playland Park will be holding an event called “Insect Walk: Who’s Out There and What Are They Doing?” from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Find out about these vital creatures as you scout for them at the preserve. Call 967-8720 for more information.

Deadline for our What’s Going On section is every Thursday at noon. Though space is not guaranteed, we will do our best to accommodate your listing. Please send all items to news@hometwn.com.

 
Playland-18

Rye Playland revenue and attendance up over 2014

By CHRIS EBERHART
Playland had what was considered by many to be a successful season in 2014, and early revenue and attendance figures as of July 19 have already outpaced last year’s numbers. 

Through July 20, 2014, Playland had a total attendance of 230,295 and took in gross revenue of $4.26 million. This year through July 19, which includes the latest numbers obtained by the Review, Playland had a little less than 5,000 more patrons visit the park—235,125—and made nearly $150,000 more—$4.4 million—in gross revenue.

The major difference between this year and last was better weather on July 4—which is generally the busiest day of the year at the amusement park—after a washout in 2014. Through the month of June and heading into the July 4 week, attendance and revenue figures were nearly identical, with 135,587 visitors in 2014 compared to 134,031 visitors in 2015, and a gross revenue of $2.58 million in 2014 and a gross revenue of $2.51 million in 2015.

After July 4, 2015, numbers spiked to 178,998 visitors and gross revenue of $3.35 million, as opposed to 165,353 visitors and a revenue of $3.12 million in 2014.

Westchester County Deputy Parks Commissioner Peter Tartaglia said the numbers indicate about a 6 percent uptick in business over last year.

“Last year, we had the tail end of a hurricane that destroyed most of business on July 4 except for the fireworks show late at night,” Tartaglia said. “This year we had some rain, but it rained early. So from about 4 p.m. on we packed our parking lot and made up a lot of revenue.”

Since hitting a low point in 2013, Playland has been on the upswing in terms of both attendance and revenue, and the driving forces behind that, Tartaglia said, are good weather and an increased number of promotions.

“Weather is always the main factor and will continue to be,” Tartaglia said referring to the amusement park industry, and, in particular, Playland. “Then there are the promotions and discounts that we’ve
been adding.”

Last year, the county started half-priced evenings on Tuesdays and Thursdays at Playland. This year, the county extended that initiative to include Wednesdays and also added a Mother’s Day and Father’s Day promotion, where moms and dads were able to enter the park for free.

“Those are just some of the new promotions,” Tartaglia said.

Playland could see another jump in productivity beginning next year and beyond with Standard Amusements preparing to take over management of what is the only county-owned amusement park in the nation.

The agreement between the county and Standard was approved by the Westchester County Board of Legislators in June. As part of the 15-year Playland agreement, Standard will invest $25 million—$2.25 million in upfront costs to the county and $22.75 million in direct investments into the 87-year-old amusement park—and pay annual rising payments to the county starting at $300,000. The county will also receive 7.5 percent of the profits once Standard recoups its initial investment.

Currently, Standard and the county are in a co-management period, a time when Standard is shadowing the county in order to better understand how the park is run. The co-management concludes at the end of October, at which point Standard will make a final decision if it wants to stay in or opt out of the agreement.

“So far [the co-management period] has been good,” Tartaglia said. “They’ve been observing and asking questions like ‘Why do you do this?’ or ‘When do you do this?’ So far, it’s been productive.”

CONTACT: christopher@hometwn.com

At the end of June, the 2014 and 2015 attendance and revenue numbers for Playland were nearly identical with 134,031 and 135,587 visitors in 2015 and 2014, respectively, and gross revenues of $2.51 million and $2.58 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. The major difference was the July 4 weekend weather which allowed the 2015 numbers to surge.

At the end of June, the 2014 and 2015 attendance and revenue numbers for Playland were nearly identical with 134,031 and 135,587 visitors in 2015 and 2014, respectively, and gross revenues of $2.51 million and $2.58 million in 2015 and 2014, respectively. The major difference was the July 4 weekend weather which allowed the 2015 numbers to surge.

 

GOP-FRONT

GOP candidates dropped from Ind. line

Mayor Norman Rosenblum, left, and Deputy Mayor Lou Santoro have been disqualified from maintaining the endorsement of the Westchester County Independence Party after a challenge from village Democrats revealed a deficiency of required petition signatures. File photo

Mayor Norman Rosenblum, left, and Deputy Mayor Lou Santoro have been disqualified from maintaining the endorsement of the Westchester County Independence Party after a challenge from village Democrats revealed a deficiency of required petition signatures. File photo

By JACKSON CHEN
The mayor and deputy mayor of the Village of Mamaroneck will no longer appear on the Westchester County Independence Party ballot line in the November election after challenges to their petition revealed an insufficient amount of signatures.

When announcing their re-election campaign in June, Mayor Norman Rosenblum and Deputy Mayor Lou Santoro were both endorsed by the Republican, Conservative and Independence parties. After receiving those endorsements, the parties and the selected candidates were responsible for gathering a required amount of signatures from registered voters within each party for the endorsements to stick.

While the petitions contained a sufficient amount of signatures on paper, Stuart Tiekert, a Democratic district leader, challenged the validity of the signatures for each of the party lines that Rosenblum and Santoro garnered.

Tiekert—who is working on the Democratic campaign of Dan Natchez for mayor and Thomas Burt for trustee—and his efforts led to a ruling from the Westchester County Board of Elections which said that Rosenblum and Santoro would not appear on the Independence Party line for the village’s November elections because the petitions of that party were short by four valid signatures.

According to the Board of Election’s ruling, the petition for Rosenblum and Santoro contained 43 signatures. However, the board ruled that 22 of Tiekert’s objections to the signatures were valid, leaving the duo with only 21 valid signatures. Rosenblum and Santoro required 25 valid signatures, leaving them four short.

After the challenge, Rosenblum and Santoro appealed the Board of Election’s ruling, which moved the case to the Westchester County Supreme Court. However, Judge Mary Smith upheld the board’s determination that 22 of the 43 total signatures were invalid, leaving the two candidates with the option of pursuing the matter by utilizing subpoenas to prove the identity of some of the signatures.

However, Rosenblum said they decided not to object to the court’s decision. The mayor added that this was his first time experiencing a petition challenge, prompting him to hire Jeffrey Binder, an attorney based in White Plains.

“You could continue to fight and subpoena people, but that’s not why I’m running for mayor,” Rosenblum said. “I’m not running for mayor and Lou [Santoro] isn’t running for trustee to support a court case.”

The mayor said Tiekert’s actions were egregious and contributed to the stigma of personal agendas instilled in local politics.

“This is typical as far as someone trying to win an election not by people voting, but by technicalities and legalities,” Rosenblum said, adding that he expects Tiekert’s challenge to backfire on the Democratic candidates.

But for Democratic candidate Dan Natchez, the invalid signatures and subsequent court proceedings showed a lack of preparation and review.

“A good number of signatures weren’t even in the village,” Natchez said. “If you don’t know what the boundaries are in the village carrying your petition, that says a lot.”

The Independence line will now fall by the wayside with neither of the tickets carrying that voting block on the November ballot.

In offering some explanation in losing the Independence line, Rosenblum said that the majority of the 22 rejected signatures may have been the result of a lawsuit between the leaders of the Independence Party and Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, a Republican. In a lawsuit filed in June 2014, Astorino was accused of populating the Independence Party enrollment with thousands of Republican staff, family and friends in an attempt to win the endorsement during his run for re-election for county executive in 2013.

While accusations of fraud seem to be the defining factor in the Astorino lawsuit, Rosenblum said that wasn’t a factor in the Democrats’ challenge.

“I have no problem with the election law, it clearly says in there the purpose of this type of review is to avoid election fraud,” Rosenblum said. “There was certainly no fraud in this case; it was a matter of technicality.”

While the mayor and Santoro are four valid signatures short of appearing on the Independence line in November, Rosenblum said the important factor is that they were still endorsed by the party.

On the other hand, the Democratic candidates Natchez and Burt will only appear on the Democratic Party line and they faced no challenges to their petitions. Critical of the invalid signatures, Natchez said that the village’s elected officials should follow the rules of the democratic process and that their willingness to cut corners has cost the taxpayers of the village.

Tiekert declined comment.

CONTACT: jackson@hometwn.com

 
SERRANO1

Serrano settles into new position

Marcus Serrano, the City of Rye’s new manager, has occupied the second floor of City Hall for more than a month now. File photo

Marcus Serrano, the City of Rye’s new manager, has occupied the second floor of City Hall for more than a month now. File photo

By JACKSON CHEN
More than a month into his new managerial role with the City of Rye, freshly-hired Marcus Serrano has been adjusting to a new environment and attempting to improve communication throughout the city’s departments. 

Serrano, who was hired by the Rye City Council on June 10, left his village administrator position with the Village of Dobbs Ferry to fill Rye’s city manager’s office. At the time of his departure from the village, Serrano was being paid an annual salary of $170,000, according to his Dobbs Ferry employment agreement, which was renewed on May 26. The city manager is now being paid an annual salary of $195,000 by Rye and will maintain his residency in Peekskill.

The new manager was expected to begin approximately Aug. 11, but Serrano said that after discussions with the village board in Dobbs Ferry, he was able to jump into the new job earlier than anticipated on June 29. After arriving early, however, Serrano took a nine-day unpaid vacation early into his employment with Rye, and returned to the office around the third week of July.

“I’m very thrilled to work with the department heads and staff that have such heart and soul for the city,” Serrano, 53, said of his experience so far in Rye. During the month that he has been in office, Serrano said he has been working with many department heads to achieve better communication when tackling city tasks.

“Everybody’s been working on their own, per se,” Serrano said. “[In] every single department, people have been saying we’ve been waiting for direction on certain items.”

Contrasting the messy administration of former city manager Scott Pickup, Serrano said he wants the department heads to feel comfortable in reaching out to him to bounce ideas off of.

“I can’t tell what kind of management skills he had or how he worked with department heads,” Serrano said, referring to Pickup. “But I’m the type of person to meet with department heads, to go down and talk with them.”

To combat this isolation, the city manager wants to incorporate software and day-to-day policies that would help departments communicate more easily with each other to improve efficiency and promote a more collaborative effort when working on certain projects. However, Serrano said he was still currently in the data-gathering stage of his initiative.

As for working with the council, the city manager said it’s been a pleasure to see how involved they are when tackling issues.

“They want to hear all the opinions and gather all the data first before making the decision,” Serrano said of the council’s process. “I think they’re being very thoughtful in the process from what I’ve seen so far.”

For the mayor and City Council, Serrano has been just as involved in the city’s ongoing issues as they have, according to Mayor Joe Sack, a Republican. The mayor added that Serrano’s enthusiasm and engaging personality has rubbed off on the council.

“He has pretty seamlessly picked up on all the issues we’ve been dealing with,” Sack said of Serrano. “He already is conversant in just about every issue we touch on a daily basis.”

In drawing from his experience with Dobbs Ferry and his administrative roles within Peekskill and Ossining, Serrano said his easy assimilation into Rye was made possible by many different situations he’s faced in the past.

“Since I started in the ‘80s, I’ve always been talking to residents, taxpayers and the community members,” Serrano said. “I think years of experience of looking at taxes, water, garbage; I’ve dealt with every single issue.”
However, one of the larger responsibilities Serrano was thrust into was finding replacements for key city staff members. After Dawn Nodarse retired in June, the city clerk’s office has only Deputy Clerk Diane Moore manning the fort. Several weeks into Nodarse’s retirement, Serrano said he’s expected to interview a candidate for the position next week.

On top of receiving interest for the city clerk position, the city manager is planning to send out advertisements for a replacement for the transitional Police Commissioner Bill Pease, who was hired by the former city manager Frank Culross.

“I’m looking for somebody with experience, someone who’s pleasant to work with,” Serrano said, adding that it won’t be a challenge to fill in the gaps. “I think we have a good possibility of getting some good candidates for both positions.

Working so far in Rye, Serrano said he normally tends to one or two residents a day who usually are directed to a more appropriate department. But the city manager is still capable of handling an upset resident. Serrano said he was recently met by a frustrated resident after a garbage truck damaged his property. After explaining that he couldn’t simply cut the resident a check, Serrano said he explained the process until the resident’s angry demeanor turned into understanding.

“At the end of the day, I don’t get a bonus for saying ‘no’ to people,” Serrano said. “I’m out here to help as much as I can and run through the process people have to go through.”

CONTACT: jackson@hometwn.com

 
SUBWAY

Tuckahoe Subway passes through Planning Board

Subway will become part of Tuckahoe’s Main Street landscape after the village Planning Board passed the application with a 3-1 vote during its July 21 meeting. Melba Caliano was the lone dissenting vote, and David Barra, the newest member of the Planning Board, abstained from voting.

The franchise sub shop will occupy a vacant storefront at 73 Main St.

Throughout the review process, village residents vocalized their displeasure with a Subway coming into Tuckahoe and raised a number of concerns including traffic and parking, taking revenue away from local businesses in the area and not fitting in with the Tuckahoe landscape.

Caliano said she voted against the project because the food Subway would be serving isn’t healthy and its opening would add to an already congested Main Street corridor.

“The overarching principle in zoning and planning is the protection of the public’s safety, health and welfare,” Caliano said. “And it’s clear to me that Subway is not offering the type of food choices that people should be partaking of. And it’s clear to me that it will bring traffic to the area, so we have health and we have safety [concerns]. Those reasons are why I’m not voting for it.”

Subway’s architect defended the project by saying there are two Subways in Greenwich, Conn.

“That’s the most exclusive town in the Northeast,” Leonard Brandes said. “So it’s not like it doesn’t belong in a particular town setting. I don’t think that attitude works.”

The village residents who were against the project are currently forming a petition that urges the Board of Trustees to change its zoning code to prevent other fast food establishments and chain restaurants from entering Tuckahoe.

Tuckahoe Mayor Steve Ecklond, a Republican, told the Review in a previous interview the trustees are working with Village Administrator David Burke to discuss their options regarding a potential zoning change.
The goal would be to follow in neighboring Eastchester’s footsteps to establish a ban on fast food by first deciding which food establishments exist and then which would be considered appropriate and which would be prohibited by the village.

-Reporting by Chris Eberhart